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John, Mary, and Ted (a list) wore red, green and blue (a list)
respectively (matched).

By matching the two lists we get:

John wore red
Mary wore green
Ted wore blue.

The shorthand way to write this is as a pair of matched lists using
the word "respectively":

John, Mary, and Ted wore red, green and blue respectively.

--gary

On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 4:36 PM, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> If the  lists are meant to be matched, whatt do you mean? YOur examples
> sound like they match.
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> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ian Spolarich" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, December 18, 2012 7:01 PM
> Subject: Re: respectively
>
>
>> >
>>>
>>> >I was wondering how other languages, natural or constructed handle
>>> > >matched
>>> lists.
>>>
>>
>> In Adranik (CL), respectivity (?) is implied.
>> If the two lists are not intended to be matched, the speaker must separate
>> them into individual lists or clauses, such as "Jim took an apple, Rebecca
>> (took) a pear, etc. etc."
>>
>> When you think about it, it's really rather silly *not* to match lists.