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I saw this earlier on another forum and just shrugged.  Now that I look at
it closer, I have to shrug harder.  They don't seem to have a good grasp --
or maybe it's just the translation -- of Old English.  (Of *course* Old
English couldn't split the infinitive!  It had a single-word infinitive for
most of its history).




On Sat, Dec 15, 2012 at 12:39 PM, George Corley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I saw this posted to the Facebook group.  My reaction was that whoever did
> this analysis is either being horribly misrepresented or doesn't understand
> language contact.
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 15, 2012 at 12:31 PM, Daniel Prohaska
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
> >  What a crock of crap!!!!
> > Dan
> >
> >
> > On Dec 15, 2012, at 6:15 PM, Sai wrote:
> >
> > > Original article:
> > >
> https://www.apollon.uio.no/artikler/2012/4-engelsk-er-skandinavisk.html
> > >
> > > Translation:
> > >
> >
> http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.apollon.uio.no%2Fartikler%2F2012%2F4-engelsk-er-skandinavisk.html
> > >
> > > Meta-article in English:
> > >
> >
> http://www.newsinenglish.no/2012/11/27/english-is-a-scandinavian-language/
> > >
> > > Enjoy. :-P
> > >
> > > - Sai
> >
>



-- 
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