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On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 11:33 PM, Logan Kearsley <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> On 14 December 2012 15:27, David Peterson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > As someone who cares very deeply about hair, bad hair refers to frizzy
> hair iff one's hair is supposed to be straight by choice. For someone who's
> going for a wavy or curly hairstyle, a bad hair day is when the hair is
> straight—and is commonly referred to as "flat". When I had long hair, it
> was as straight as if I'd use a flattening iron, and I HATED it. I wanted
> Jon Bon Jovi's hair! Alas, it was not to be. My hair was flat and
> straight—admired by girls, who, nevertheless, did not admire the wearer:
> they simply wanted to *have* my hair. After a year of that, I never went
> back, and it's been short ever since (or short by my standards. Long by US
> military standards, I suppose).
>
> I empathize. Me and my brothers all have thick, wavy hair with Natural
> Volume while my sisters' hair is quite thin, and they not infrequently
> express disgust that "great hair" is wasted on us guys. Somewhat
> ironically, though, my wife (not to mention university dress code)
> insists that I keep it short(-ish), and my mom and all barbers I have
> yet encountered are certain that my hair is absolutely horrible for
> working with- it is, quote, "like trying to cut through iron".
>
> -l.
>

It's the first time I hear describing hair as "good" or "bad". My sister
has an extremely curly hair. It's impossible to comb, but no one ever
considered her hair bad - just nice or even fancy, "like Angela Davis/
Halle Berry", since it's rare in Russia. My wife often calls my hair "nice"
but only because I can grow them longer, and because they are "noble"
curly, and also are of that brown color that she considers "superb". I
don't see what's so abut her dark blond anyway.

OT: Why the heck would they impose a dress-code in a university. I used to
teach students with my hair braided with beads a la Jack Sparrow, and the
only things I've heard from colleagues and administration was: "it suits
you". I was not the first one - another colleague professors (from an old
Swiss aristocratic family, btw) colored his hair green, and gave lectures
like that.