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Consider the following sentence: Jim, Tom, and Rebecca respectively 
took an apple, a pear, and an orange. 
   
  This sentence contains two lists. The first one is "Jim, Tom, and 
Rebecca." The second one is "an apple, a pear, and an orange."
  The word "respectively" means the two lists match up. That is, the 
first item in the first list matches up with the first item in the 
second list. The second item with the second item. The third item with 
the third item. 

Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews wrote:
>
  > What's a matched list?
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Matthew Turnbull":
>
> >I was wondering how other languages, natural or constructed handle matched
> > lists. In English they seem to be handled by the word respectively. 
> >
> > An example of what I'm talking about. 
> >
> > There were three houses, which were painted brown, blue and white
> > respectively. 
> > Jim, Tom and Rebecca respectively took an apple, a pear and an 
> orange. > (Jim
> > took an apple, Tom took a pear and Rebecca took an orange.)