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English and Dutch (as well as Frisian and Low German) don't 'do' anything differently in this respect, they rather retain a common archaism, the Germanic /t/, while the High German varieties are the innovators here and shift Gmc /t/ to [s] or [ts]. Any others?
Dan

On Dec 16, 2012, at 11:33 AM, yuri wrote:

> On 16 December 2012 23:25, Daniel Prohaska wrote:
>> Dutch?. Why do people always have to project their national language onto the
>> origins of English. Like Dutch, but also like High and Low German, and Frisian,
>> English is an offshoot of the West-Germanic branch of Germanic. They share
>> several common innovations such as WG gemination and loss of the masc.
>> nomonative ending /z/. Dutch is no more closely related to English than Frisian and
>> Low German.
>> Dan
> 
> There are many instances where Dutch and German do things differently,
> and English follows the Dutch way.
> E.g. off the top of my head I can think of dozens of words where
> German has /s/ in the same position that Dutch and English both have
> /t/. (e.g. Fuss, voet, foot).
> 
> Yuri de Groot