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On 06/01/2013 15:46, Charles W Brickner wrote:
> -----Original Message----- From: Constructed Languages
> List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of
> Jim Henry
>
> Someone who knows Greek better than I do can perhaps
> correct me on this, but I'm pretty sure "gold out of
> dung" is the gloss of "Ekskybalauron", the *other* book
> Urquhuart wrote about his conlang.
> ============================================
>
> ἐκ (ἐξ) ek(s) = from out of
>
> το σκύβαλον (to skúbalon) = dung
>
> I don’t know the word “auron”.  The closest word to that
> that I know is “αὔρα” which means ‘breeze’.

Quite correct.  αὔρα is also found used of the smoke from
incense, savory aroma of fried fish and, more
metaphorically, of the attractive influence of a female, a
change in the course of events, a bodily thrill inter_alia.

Urquhart is best known for his translations of Rebelais.
Isn't Ekskybalauron a bit of Rabelaisian humor?  - the
fragrant small emanating from dung.

> Of course, “aurum” is the Latin word for ‘gold’.  The
> Greek word is χρῡςός  (chrysós).
>
> “Gold from dung” as a meaning of ‘ekskybalauron’ sounds
> like a folk etymology to me.

... and to me also.  His other Greek titles are Greek, not
Graeco-Latin mongrels.
==========================================================

On 06/01/2013 15:24, Jim Henry wrote:
[snip]
>
>>>> Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromarty described
> his language, Logopandecteision, whose name literally
> means “gold out of dung,” as “a most exquisite jewel,
> more precious than a diamond inchased in gold, the like
> whereof was never seen in any age,”[snip] <<<
>
> Someone who knows Greek better than I do can perhaps
> correct me on this, but I'm pretty sure "gold out of
> dung" is the gloss of "Ekskybalauron",

See above.   Most certainly Logopandecteision does *not*
literally mean "gold out of dung" - not, indeed, does
Ekskybalauron unless it's a Graeco-Latin hybrid.  Also it
was Ekskybalauron that was described as "a most exquisite
jewel, more precious than a diamond inchased in gold, the
like whereof was never seen in any age", not Logopandecteision.

> the *other* book Urquhuart wrote about his conlang.
> "Logopandecteision" glosses as something more like
> "word-all-acceptable".

Greek πανδέκτηαι (pandéktai) [fem. pl] "all=receivers" was
the name of a Universal Dictionary or Encyclopedia such as
those compiled by Tiro or by Dorotheus.  Also Justinian's
law books were called by this name, which has been
anglicized as 'the Pandects.'  I'm sure Urquhart word have
been well aware of all this.

The logo- part is indeed, "word" or "reason, logic" etc.
What the ending -(e)ision was intended to mean, if anything,
is anyone's guess.  There is an obscure Greek word ἴσιον
(ision) meaning some sort of "purgative bark" - one can
never be sure with Urquhart    ;)

> And I'm not sure he intended either of those book
> titles, "Logopandecteision" or "Ekskybalauron", as the
> actual name of his language,

Nor am I. Was he even serious about a universal language, or
was mocking the composers of contemporary 'philosophical'
auxlangs?

-- 
Ray
==================================
http://www.carolandray.plus.com
==================================
There ant no place like Sussex,
Until ye goos above,
For Sussex will be Sussex,
And Sussex won't be druv!
[W. Victor Cook]