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Well there already are spelling pronunciations that are incredibly
common throughout English. I know very few people who pronounce
'forehead' as 'forrid', for example. This is a big problem with words
that are often read but rarely heard; I pronounced epitome as three
syllables E-pi-tome with stress on the first syllable for a long time
and never equated it with the word e-PI-to-me that I would hear.

On 1/22/13, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> A brilliant idea!
>
> Surely "cafe" and "cake" should both be pronounced as two-syllable
> words with the accent on the second vowel.
>
> All that is needed for such a proposal to take effect is a simple,
> consistent set of pronunciation rules for each vowel, consonant, vowel
> cluster and consonant cluster, as well as rules for placing stress
> consistently. That solves the entire problem instantly!
>
> Well played.
>
> --gary
>
> On Mon, Jan 21, 2013 at 12:32 PM, A. da Mek <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> I wonder whether anyone ever considered the opposite approach to the
>> reform:
>> not to write what is pronounced, but to pronounce what is written. In the
>> Age of the Internet, there are more people knowing written English than
>> spoken English.
>


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