Print

Print


On 1/20/2013 3:39 PM, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:
> Hallo conlangers!
>
> On Sunday 20 January 2013 00:02:28 Herman Miller wrote:
>
>> The ambiguity with "ng" is admittedly one of the drawbacks of
>> conventions like these including the spelling I use on the map (in names
>> like "Kerngat" and "Nagmingo"). A name like "Nagmingo" could be
>> [naɡminɡo], [naɡmiŋɡo], or [naɡmiŋo] (not counting possible variations
>> in the vowels that aren't distinguished in the romanization).
>
> In my romanization of Old Albic, _ng_ is always /ŋ/; the sequence
> /ŋg/ is transcribed _ngg_, /ŋk/ is _ngc_, and /ng/ does not occur
> (a nasal preceding a stop always assimilates to the latter's POA).
>
> Of course, in the native script, there is a letter for /ŋ/ (also
> letters for /ɸ/, /θ/ and /x/, so no digraphs are needed at all).

I just noticed a fourth possibility with the name Kerngat, since the "n" 
could be part of an "rn" digraph, which would make it [keɳɡat].

Many of the languages on Sarangia are written in alphabets that could be 
described as featural, although sound changes over time might complicate 
things. So the languages that have /ŋ/ as a phoneme probably all have a 
way to write the sound with a single character (as Tirelat does).

I've used "ñ" to write the /ŋ/ sound in Tirelat, but currently I just 
use "ŋ". (If I'm going to use an inconvenient character in the first 
place, I might as well use one that won't be misread.)