Print

Print


In my normal Romanization of Tirelat (and other recent languages), I 
tend to use diacritics so that each phoneme of the language is 
represented by a single letter. E.g.

Su tiski marvi žihl jĕŕastajan vë łivi žeġ jĕlak.
The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Rĕkezanuj my zjaniki tanigira da, rĕlinajžataj vë rĕsarga.
If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look around you.

But recently I've been working on a map of the world, with lots of 
tentative names for places where I don't even know what languages are 
spoken. I decided to use a consistent spelling for all place names, 
rather than trying to figure out the phonology for all the languages 
ahead of time. E.g., there's a name "Lanyamets", but I don't have a clue 
whether "ny" represents two phonemes /nj/ or a single phoneme /ɲ/ in 
whatever language is spoken there, or whether "ts" is considered as one 
or two phonemes.

http://www.prismnet.com/~hmiller/jpg/sarangia.jpg

I do have accents on some vowels (e.g. "Sujinán"), and dieresis/umlaut 
marks over vowels for additional vowel sounds, but I'm thinking that it 
would be a lot easier if I just started using "ts" for the /ts/ sound in 
Tirelat instead of "ċ", and "dz" for /dz/ instead of "ż". Using "gh" for 
the voiced velar fricative /ɣ/ instead of "ġ" would be more convenient 
for typing. And why not use "hr" for a voiceless r? That would be 
ambiguous if I continue using -h for long vowels (is "lahra" pronounced 
/la:ra/ or /lar̥a/?), but I can write long vowels as double (so /la:ra/ 
would be spelled "laara").

For the world map, I've also used a more English-like convention where 
"j" represents /dʒ/ and "y" is /j/. With these conventions, Tirelat 
spelling might look something like this:

Su tiski marvi zhiil yëhrastayan vë hlivi zhegh yëlak.
The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Rëkezanuy mï zyaniki tanigira da, rëlinayzhatay vë rësarga.
If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look around you.

(The difference between "ĕ" and "ë" in Tirelat romanization is only a 
spelling convention, following the way Tirelat is spelled in the 
Kjaginiċ alphabet.)