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2013/1/15 Roman Rausch <[log in to unmask]>:
>>Are there any studies that claim a tendency for some phones being used
>>to masculine and others to feminine? In the negative case, do you have
>>any intuition or preference yourself?
>
> There is the paper by Russel Ultan (Size-sound symbolism; in: Universals of Human Language, Volume 2: Phonology; 1978) where he notices that feminines and diminutives tend to be marked similarly across languages, namely most often by high front vowels or palatalization.

Interesting! That's the case of Esperanto with its feminine "-in-"
that sounds as a type of diminutive. I always thought that this kind
of thing could irritate feminists, so I have a tendency to move from
"i" towards "e". But I have seen that there are a lot of words for
"woman" with "o" and "u" as well ("donna", "onna", "nu", "mujer",
etc.), and that's why I opened this topic.

My conlang's female morpheme evolution was, until now, "fiem-" ->
"menf-" -> "ninf-" -> "nenf-". I did like "menf-" but I realized that
it has "men" that resembles English... men.

BTW, I have noticed that Lojban has individual words for "male",
"female", "man", "woman", "boy", "girl", "child" "human" (different
from "person"). Isn't it too much for a logical language, as "boy"
would be easily obtained from "child" and "male"? Or from "human",
"immature" and "male"?