Print

Print


Aren't Finnish, Hungarian, and Turkish all able to use a lot of suffixes at
once?
E.g., Finnish "tottelemattomuudestansa" = 'because of his disobedience' is
tottele-ma-ttom-uude-sta-nsa (obey + deverbal suffix, used to form
action/result nouns from verbs + -less + quality noun from adjective +
elative singular + 3rd person possessive), with five suffixes.

stevo

On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 5:53 AM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> 2013/1/18 Patrick Dunn <[log in to unmask]>:
> > That's a really good question.  I'm not sure how one would begin to
> answer
> > it in any sort of analytic way, but when you consider things like Ancient
> > Greek or Sanskrit, which have frankly *InSANE* amounts of inflection that
> > people actually seemed to use (judging, at least, from the writing -- the
> > spoken language may have been less complex in practice),
>
> And that's the core of my question. In Portuguese, there are a lot of
> verbal forms that people rarely use in spoken language. I have heard
> also that German people don't use the genitive case anymore and the
> French diglossia has been widely discussed in this list. Maybe there's
> some "people valve" to expel excessive inflection.
>
> > it seems like a
> > pretty large range of permissible inflection.  And, it seems to me, with
> no
> > evidence whatsoever but a hunch, that the more agglutinating rather than
> > inflecting a language is, the more such things it might support.
> >
> > (An ancient Greek verb is potentially conjugated for three persons, three
> > numbers, one present tense, two past tenses, one future tense, the
> perfect
> > aspect, three voices [active, passive, middle], three moods [indicative,
> > optative, subjunctive] and a full range of participles, infinitives, and
> > imperatives in most of these tenses, aspects, and voices . . . and so
> on.)
>
> How many of them are permitted in Modern Greek?
>
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Jan 18, 2013 at 9:37 AM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]
> >wrote:
> >
> >> I have noticed that many languages have some inflections that are not
> >> really used in everyday speech, being substituted with others (what
> >> reduces the total number of inflection) or with more analytical
> >> structures.
> >>
> >> Do you think there is a limit of the number of word inflection people
> >> on the streets can deal with?
> >>
> >> Até mais!
> >>
> >> Leonardo
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available for
> > order from Finishing Line
> > Press<
> http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitles.htm>
> > and
> > Amazon<
> http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2
> >.
>