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On Mon, Jan 28, 2013 at 5:20 AM, Alex Fink <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 21:16:26 -0800, Sylvia Sotomayor <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> >The noun classes are:
> >I rational animates, people
> >IIA wild animals and body parts
> >IIB paired body parts
> >IIC domesticated food animals
> >III plural animals (like ants) and weather phenomena
> >IV landcape features and other natural phenomena, forces, events
> >V non-solid natural phenomena, light and darkness and dreams
> >VIA most natural objects
> >VIB food items
> >VIC natural collectives
> >VIIA man-made objects
> >VIIB paired man-made objects like gloves or shoes, sets of man-made
> objects
> >VIIC generally plural or elongated man-made objects, like string
> >VIII speech, abstractions.
>
> Very nice.
>
> How does the subclass structure manifest grammatically, i.e. when does one
> see the 8-class system and when the 14-class system?  Do "A" and "B" and
> "C" have some sort of independent morphological existence orthogonal to the
> division between II and VI and VII?
>
> Alex
>

The subclasses usually differ from each other by just one or two
inflections for number within one case. If they differed in more than one
case, I counted it as a separate class. Otherwise III could be IID. A, B,
and C are just a numbering system and do not have any other usage.
-S
-- 
Sylvia Sotomayor

The sooner I fall behind the more time I have to catch up.