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2013/3/9 Patrick Dunn <[log in to unmask]>:
> I think Leonardo was asking how difficult it was for French speakers to
> learn a language that has phonemic stress, such as English, rather than
> perfectly predictable stress (or no stress, IIRC, in some dialects) as in
> French.  He was comparing it to tone, not implying that French was tonal.

Exact!

AFAIK, all French vowels except schwa are equally stressed.

>
> Hmm, tonal French . . . how would *that* arise?  All those missing
> consonants at the ends of words . . . hmm.
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 9, 2013 at 3:56 PM, George Corley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> On Sat, Mar 9, 2013 at 3:47 PM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]
>> >wrote:
>>
>> > I was thinking about how French people perceive stressed-unstressed
>> > contrast. Is it as strange and difficult as tones for those whose
>> > native language doesn't have them?
>> >
>>
>> Wait -- French has stress, not tone.  I am reasonably sure of this.
>>
>> Now, if we actually talk about tonal languages, then this is interesting.
>> I would imagine that speakers of complex tone systems would either ignore
>> stress or map it to a particular tone (Mandarin fourth tone -- a falling
>> tone -- seems to sound very similar to an English primary stress, but I
>> don't know if Mandarin speakers actually perceive it that way).  Speakers
>> of pitch-accent or simple tone systems may fix stress as a high tone or
>> something like that.  In fact, I've heard that it's still under debate
>> whether some simple-tone languages have both tone _and_ stress.
>>
>
>
>
> --
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