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For those experiencing difficulty recalling a language they haven't used in
some time,  I suggest a method I stumbled on that works for me.
Spend a day immersed in that one language, reading and listening to it,
speaking it aloud to yourself or others if possible. Sleep on it. The next
day, your old facility is back. Sort of as if you had reminded your brain
where the old connections were.
I think memory is stored inn the whole brain, like a hologram, not just a
few cells.

Interesting experiment reported recently of researchers putting human brain
glia cells into mice brains. The treated mice outperformed control mice in
learning mazes and in memory tests. Maybe it's not the size of the brain,
but the kind of components and their organization?
God bless you always, all ways,
Paul

On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 10:14 AM, H. S. Teoh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 02:41:03PM +0000, Krista D. Casada wrote:
> > Well, that's useful! At least your newest stays "on top." My older new
> > ones want to be first. (I occasionally have the terrible feeling that
> > my brain is divided in half, with my L1 on one side and everything
> > else scrambling for space on the other.)
> [...]
>
> This isn't the first time this is brought up on this list. A long while
> back, there was a discussion about how we seem to have separate "slots"
> for the language we acquired in our youth, but after a certain age, it
> seems there's only one slot left for "foreign language", whatever that
> may be, and trying to learn more than one at a time causes one to "crowd
> out" the other(s).
>
> Now I'm concerned that this is happening not only to languages I
> acquired later in life, but also to childhood languages that haven't
> been in active use. :-(
>
>
> T
>
> --
> "You know, maybe we don't *need* enemies." "Yeah, best friends are about
> all I can take." -- Calvin & Hobbes
>