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--- On Wed, 3/20/13, George Corley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: George Corley <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [CONLANG] "English has the most words of any language"
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 1:32 PM
> On Wed, Mar 20, 2013 at 12:06 PM,
> Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
> > --- On Wed, 3/20/13, Mechthild Czapp <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> > > Through the Language Glass opines that
> undocumented
> > > languages have fewer words than those with a
> literary
> > > tradition since said tradition prevents deprecated
> words
> > > from falling out of use. If you consider that, the
> size of
> > > the language is not a benefit, but a curse: a load
> of
> > > obsolete, deprecated and vintage words, which take
> up space
> > > in the human mind and to a point become elevated
> to metrics
> > > of not just education but intelligence.
> >
> > Heaven forbid our minds should become cluttered with
> obsolete words, rather
> > than truly useful information like World Series stats
> for the last hundred
> > years or Brittany Spears lyrics or how to navigate
> through World of
> > Warcraft!
> 
> 
> Oh, yes, it's such a wonderful argument to assume that the
> the things
> someone would rather spend resources on are actually banal
> and worthless.
>  Unless your point is that we spend resources on plenty of
> things "just for
> fun" -- in which case, the point is taken.

No, just a general comment on the idea that it's a "curse" to retain 
old vocabulary (of course, we keep all sorts of old, vintage and otherwise
ancient words around anyways). And also a comment on the general state of 
society at large and the sort of things that would fill all the space 
vacated by the exit of such words.

Padraic