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On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:00:31AM -0500, Adam Walker wrote:
> Saya go makan zai ni jia li okay lah?

Ya lor, wo men semua cakap like this one leh!  :) Brings back the
memories... now I want to go for a makan at ah chek's kopi tiam...

ObConlang: one of these days I should write a story about kids from Fara
visiting the outside world and creating a pidgin of English and Tatari
Faran...


[...]
> On 5/30/13, H. S. Teoh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 12:06:07AM -0700, Garth Wallace wrote:
> >> On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 2:07 AM, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
> >> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >> > Humm, that's why I love this list, you all make me think.
> >> >
> >> > Thanks.I like burn and th last one, a bug that gives a fever.
> >> > I'm thinking to borrow medical terms from Silknish. What's code
> >> > switching?
> >> > Would that be borrowing from Yardish to Silknishz?
> >>
> >> Code-switching is when a bilingual speaker switches from speaking in
> >> one language to speaking in another. Like a kid who is fluent in both
> >> English and Spanish speaking English in class and then chatting with
> >> their friends in Spanish.
> >
> > I thought code-switching was changing between languages mid-sentence?
> >
> > Growing up in a highly multi-lingual environment, I code-switch a lot.
> > In my childhood we often borrow words from one language into another,
> > something switching between languages mid-sentence (along with change in
> > grammar -- sometimes multiple times per sentence!) It's not always clear
> > whether it's pure code-switching, or forming a pidgin. Or perhaps both
> > are just different degrees of the same?
> >
> >
> > T
> >
> > --
> > By understanding a machine-oriented language, the programmer will tend to
> > use a much more efficient method; it is much closer to reality. -- D. Knuth
> >

-- 
You have to expect the unexpected. -- RL