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One of these days I'll get around to writing an actual grammar of some sort
for one of my languages.

Adam who has discovered a use for the ornative case in the very first
sentence of the Bable text....

On Wed, May 29, 2013 at 9:44 AM, H. S. Teoh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Yesterday I stumbled across an extremely helpful page that describes the
> difference between a reference grammar and a pedagogical grammar:
>
>
> http://www-01.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAReferenceGrammar.htm
>
> It even outlines the difference between a reference grammar intended for
> native speakers, and a reference grammar intended for linguists for
> comparative purposes.
>
> It would seem that my conlang grammars so far have been pedagogical
> grammars (more-or-less, maybe with elements of a grammar intended for
> native speakers), rather than reference grammars. Since I've also
> written introductory tutorials to both of my conlangs, I'm thinking that
> perhaps I can refactor the material and turn the present version of "A
> Gentle Introduction to Tatari Faran" into a full-fledged pedagogical
> grammar, and revise the phonology/grammar pages into a real reference
> grammar of the comparative kind.
>
> What's the typical chapter organization of a reference grammar of the
> comparative kind, though? I tried looking online and found this page:
>
> http://www.uiowa.edu/intlinet/unijos/nigonnet/nlp/refgram2.htm
>
> Would that be a typical / useful structure for a reference grammar?
>
>
> T
>
> --
> Recently, our IT department hired a bug-fix engineer. He used to work for
> Volkswagen.
>