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Shong Lue Yang's Pahawh script invented in 1959 for Hmong and Khmu comes to
mind.

Adam


On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 8:32 AM, R A Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 10/10/2013 19:51, Padraic Brown wrote:
>
>> Cree syllabics (invented in the 1840s)
>>
>
> Yep - the invention of a missionary called James Evans.
>
>
>  and its daughter, Inuktitut syllabics are the other two
>> I know.
>>
>> Deseret alphabet is another,
>>
>
> Tho IMO opinion this is not in the same category as the
> other examples.  Altho the Deseret alphabet was intended to
> replace the Roman alphabet for writing English, it did not
> catch on, any more than the later Shavian alphabet caught on
> (I notice that the "Deseret News" is publish in Roman script
> in standard American spelling).
>
> If we count this, then we must count Shavian and all the
> many other writing systems proposed for English, including
> some made up by me in my teens and, I have not the slightest
> doubt, many devised by other members of this list    :)
>
>
>  also from the mid 1800s. Various shorthand systems,
>>
>
> Why from the mid 1990s?  Shorthand systems were known way
> back in ancient Greek times at least; and Cicero's freedman,
> Tiro, would be somewhat aggrieved to be passed over.  But
> again IMO these are of a different nature. None have, nor
> were they ever intended, to be used as general writing
> systems for a community.  They existed and still exist as
> supplementary to other systems for the express purpose of
> writing a language at (nearly) the same speed as speaking.
>
>
>  ______________________________**__ From: Chris Peters
>>>
>> [snip]
>
>
>>>> It's not often one can pinpoint the date of
>>>> promulgation of a whole system of writing (let alone
>>>>  the author of that system).
>>>>
>>>>
>>> I'm only aware of two examples of this:  Hangul and
>>> Cherokee.  Are there any others in the Natlang world?
>>>
>>
> Other examples of scripts which, like Hangul, were
> promulgated to replace a previous system of writing that
> come to my mind are:
>
> After the restoration of democracy in Athens, during the
> archonship of Eucleides (403-402) the Athenians voted to
> replace the old Attic alphabet with the alphabet of the
> Ionians of Asia minor; this has survived till the present
> day in the upper case Greek letters.
>
> The adoption of an adapted form of the Roman alphabet to
> replace Arabic for the writing of Turkish was promulgated on
> Jan. 1st 1929.
>
> Tho I concede that these examples are not exactly the same
> in that Hangul was a new script, hitherto unused; whereas
> the examples above are of adaptations of existing scripts to
> replace another script.
>
> Among others who devised a new script for peoples who had
> hitherto not had a (regular) written system - just like
> Sequoyah who gave the Cherokee an script (officially adopted
> in 1825 and James Evans who did the same for the Ojibwe and
> the Cree - are:
>
> St Cyril & St Methodius who devised the Glagolitic script
> for writing the old Slav language (the script now known as
> Cyrillic appears to have been developed from the
> contemporary Greek script at a later date and has now
> replaced Glagolitic).
>
> Bishop Ulfilas who devised the Gothic alphabet for old
> Gothic language.
>
> St Mesrop Mashtots and Isaac of Armenia devised the Armenian
> script (St Mesrop is also sometimes accredited with the
> invention of the Georgian script, but this not certain).
>
> I suspect there are other examples.
>
> --
> Ray
> ==============================**====
> http://www.carolandray.plus.**com <http://www.carolandray.plus.com>
> ==============================**====
> If /ni/ can change into /ɑ/, then practically
> anything can change into anything.
> [YUEN REN CHAO]
>