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Here's another one to add to the mix....Adeste fideles

uritanga kamacan
minda i cakera.
rataka, rataka ri bet-le-hen.
ara ne mitikas
re kamon nisa neleç;
ará yan mililisam,
ará yan mililisam,
ará yan mililisam
Kris-ton karumbim.

(NB c = /tS/, ç = /S., h - /x/, everything else pretty much = Spanish)

Be present, believer,
happy and triumphant
Come, come to Bethlehem.
Let us behold him 
who is born king of the heavens.
Let us adore him,
Let us adore him,
Let us adore him,
Christ our lord.


Unfortunately, Kash polysyllabicity requires certain adjustments to the text and melody for a proper fit.




On Saturday, December 21, 2013 1:16 PM, Mechthild Czapp <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 
This is great!

I have recently gotten very interested in alternative scales and so this amazing not just in terms of the music but about the serendipity for me. Great work! 


Am Dec 20, 2013 um 23:34 schrieb Herman Miller
 <[log in to unmask]>:

> On 12/20/2013 2:11 AM, Christian Thalmann wrote:
>> It's that time of the year again!  :)  I'll start with a Jovian
>> rendition of "Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen". Any others...?
> 
> This is great!
> 
> I've been trying to come up with another Tirelat song, but I haven't had much success. Maybe this will give me some ideas. I've been working with a scale called "golden triforce". It's based on the golden ratio (phi), with an octave divided into three equal parts. Really quite a nifty scale, with good harmonic and melodic characteristics. I found it back in 2011, but just recently it occurred to me that it would be a good scale for a Sangari guitar.
> 
> When I thought about Christmas carols that would sound good in golden triforce, there's one really obvious one that came to mind. In Tirelat it comes out as "Larhakim".
> 
> I'm not good at singing even normal Western music in English. I certainly can't sing golden triforce accurately, in a language that I can barely even speak well. So of course I got Varan Mataki to sing the song. Varan is my Tirelat-singing Utau voice, and the guitar is from Garritan Jazz & Big Band.
> 
> Watch out for those microtones! Near quarter-tone intervals are a common feature of Tirelat music. They like to divide the minor third into equal parts. It might take a bit of getting used to.
> 
> https://sites.google.com/site/teamouse/Larhakim.mp3?attredirects=0
> 
> Larhakim
> 
> larha-kim łe-taga-n niiłi-vor
> king-three 1p-depart-PF east-realm
> 
> koota-da (u) make-vit rizi takki-vor
> bear-er (of) give-thing through distant-realm
> 
> zarhk žu mik-vidu, ngaj room žu lak-baaka
> field and water-source, even mountain and over-hill
> 
> miku-z my takki khak.
> follow-IPF ACC.SG distant star
> 
> ee khak u žyravi, khak u laj,
> VOC star of marvel, star of night,
> 
> khak u žemi-at šamri-paj
> star of beautiful-ness bright-most
> 
> moki viku kila-diku,
> west still guide-persist
> 
> ny-kila-k ki rĕ-łaž šnaga-šaj
> 1p.ACC-guide-IMP to 2s-light flaw-less
> 
> ------
> 
> A trio of kings, we have departed from the eastern realm,
> bearers of gifts through distant lands.
> Through fields and fountains, even mountains and high hilly places,
> following the distant star.
> 
> O star of marvel, star of light,
> Star of most bright beauty,
> Still continue to lead westward,
> guide us to your flawless light.
> 
> ------
> 
> I'm really pleased at how the lyrics came out,
 even though I had to rhyme the suffix -vor with itself... At least I managed to keep most of the rhymes, except for "fountain" and "mountain", and "yonder star" with "are" and "afar". Naturally the word I used for "fountain" is the word I used to translate Ebisédian "Ka'l3ri" in Relay 9... I just had to use that word!
> 
> I love how that three-part harmony came out in the chorus. Maybe I'll do the rest of the verses one day ... if I can come up with words for "frankincense" and "myrrh"...
> 
> Herman