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On Dec 26, 2013, at 5:39 AM, Herman Miller wrote:

> On 12/25/2013 9:14 PM, Alex Fink wrote:
>> On Wed, 25 Dec 2013 19:50:57 -0500, Herman Miller<[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>> 
>>> On 12/25/2013 5:27 PM, MorphemeAddict wrote:
>>>> I copied the carols at the blogspot site into Word, and it came out as
>>>> regular English letters, using capitals for some of the phonemes. It's sort
>>>> of readable, especially if you already know the carols.
>>> 
>>> "Sort of" readable is right.
>>> 
>>> hɑɹk ðʌ hɛɹʌld eɪnʤɛlz siŋ
>>> "ɡlɔɹi tʊ ðʌ njubɔɹn ɡiŋ! ..."
>>> 
>>> The gnu-born geeng. Yeah, thad's an improvement.
>> 
>> Hm, did you get /I/ and /i/ reversed there?
>> 
>> But into YAEPT at full speed, damning the torpedoes: does your dialect really *distinguish* _new_ from _gnu_ by whether the /j/ is present?
> 
> No, but as a General American speaker /nju/ sounds more like a foreign word.

To me as a speaker of English English US /nu/ sounds like **/fu/ for ‹few› /fju/, or **/kut/ for ‹cute› /kjut/. 

> The main issue with my dialect is the use of the same letter for "bot" and "bought", where I have "bot" merged with "baht".

I have /bQt/ and /bQ:t/ with phonemic vowel length distinction.

> Actually the text on the page is:
> 
> RArk Yb RErblT CnJelS sHN
> "KlOri tq Yb nLUPorn KHN!
> pIs on Dy vnT mDsi mXlT
> KOT vnT sHndS rekonsXlT"

Sorry, but this is illegible. Who would go for such a counterintuitive reform-spelling? 

> So it should have been "sɪŋ" and "ɡɪŋ"... I did get the vowels mixed up.
> 
> It's still got a weird vowel for "to". The "boot" vowel is written with <u>; the <q> is the "book" vowel. I notice some other errors:
> 
> strXk Yb RArp vnT JOLn Yb KOrus,
> stɹaɪk ðʌ hɑɹp ænd ʤɔjn ðʌ ɡɔɹus,
> 
> fOlg mI hn mEoi MEZd
> fɔloʊ mi ɪn mɛɔi wɛʒəɹ
> 
> Some of these are simple typos like capital M being used for lowercase m, but the "o" in "merry" is weird. If you look at the symbols used for short "o" and "r", they look pretty similar. I'm guessing that someone selected the wrong character from Character Map or something like that.
> 
> It's an interesting take on a featural script for English, but Shavian's got a bit of a head start in that area. One nice feature is that stressed vowels are simply drawn with longer strokes. It also seems to be designed to be legible at tiny sizes on a monitor.
> 
> Looking more closely at the text, it seems to be an arbitrary mix of dialects. You've got boughs of /hɔli/ ~ /hɒli/ (the script doesn't distinguish between /ɒ/ and /ɔ/), which suggests an English dialect, but /fæst/ and /pæsɛz/ where I believe /fɑst/ and /pɑsɪz/ would be more usual in English dialects. And it still has arbitrary spelling conventions: "the" is consistently spelled /ðʌ/ even when pronounced /ði/.

First of all there are English English dialects that have /fast/ and /"pasIz/, second an English dialect that does have /fA:st/ and /"pA:sIz/ would have a long vowel here. Many English dialects aren't monochronic where vowel quantity is concerned. 
Dan