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(re Spanish) ...and dia-/idio-/lectally one can hear things like "güeno" for bueno, "güevo" for huevo et al. Such things are even attested in the plays of Lope de Vega and other Renaissance writers, so it ain't nothing new... Years ago I had an Italian professor who also had trouble with English /w/ (esp. initially), pronouncing it as [gw].or maybe [Gw]





On Sunday, December 22, 2013 12:40 AM, C. Brickner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 
----- Original Message -----
From: "H. S. Teoh" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Thursday, December 19, 2013 11:43:44 AM
Subject: Re: Life after Semivowels

And on the side of [w], the dialect of Hokkien spoken in my hometown
seems to have exhibited the shift /gua/ -> /wa/. I don't know the actual
historical development, but /Gwa/ (fricativisation of [g] + shortening
of /u/) seems a likely intermediate in this sound change.
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I am far from being a linguist, but I have noticed the opposite direction of /gua/ -> /wa/ in Spanish.  For example, the Arabic ‘wadi’ has become ‘guad-’, as in Guadalupe, Gaudalajara and Gaudalquivir.  When I was studying Spanish in college, the professor gave some examples of this from the Spanglish of the American southwest.  ‘Guangüey’ means one-way (street).  ‘Güinchil’ means windshield.
Charlie