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2014/1/3 Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]>

> On Fri, Jan 3, 2014 at 10:06 AM, H. S. Teoh <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> [snip]
>
> My rules defined a consonant sound as a consonant or cluster of
> consonants (e.g. "s", "st", "str" are all single consonants) and a
> vowel is whatever can follow a consonant. Since "m" is a consonant,
> and since "you" can follow "m" (e.g. "music") then "you" is a vowel.
>
> But if a glide is a consonant then why is "oi" not a consonant? Why is
> ""ou" not a consonant? I can use "m+you"; "m+oi"; "m+ou" to argue that
> "you", "oi", and "ou" all belong to the same class. Or use the
> consonant "b" and examine "b+you" (beautiful), "b+oi" (boil), "b+ou"
> (bounty) and again "you", "oi" and "ou" belong to the same class.
>

If "st" is a consonant and since "ring" can follow "st" (e.g. "string"),
then is "ring" a vowel? My point is: m+you would be rather my+ou, being
"my" a consonant cluster as is "str" (an a consonant on its own, by your
definition).

George Marques