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On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 3:17 AM, Pete.bleackley <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> The ancestor language has /w/ /l/ and /j/ phonemically. One wave of sound
> changes creates /5/ and /L/ from clusters, and another turns them into
> allophones of /w/ and /j/ respectively. When the laterals merge, their
> non-lateral allophones are unchanged.
>
>
So there are mergers between /5/ and /w/ and between /L/ and /j/, to, let
us say, /W/ and /Y/, and then /W/ and /Y/ split so that the lateral
allophones of /W/ and /Y/ instead become allophones of /l/? In that case, I
think the allophones of /W/ and /Y/ must be in complementary distribution,
because then the splits could occur through reanalysis.

I'm not sure what your question is, tho. Could it be that you're asking how
a situation could arise in which cluster coalescence yields /W/ and /Y/
with allophones in complementary distribution?

--And.



> That's as much as I've worked out so far.
>
> Pete
>
> Sent from Samsung Mobile
>
>  And Rosta <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 12:12 AM, Pete.bleackley <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > A language I'm thinking of evolving will, at some point in its history,
> > have [w] anf [5] being allophones of each other, and [j] and [L]. I'm
> > wondering what the conditioning environments will be (I want them to be
> > different for each pair).
> >
>
> What's the phonotactic distribution of /w/ and /j/ and /l/? Do they all
> contrast in all positions?
>
>
> > At a later date, [5] and [L] will each merge with /l/, with amusing
> > morphological consequences.
> >
>
> Does that mean that /w/ and /j/ merge with /l/ too?
>
> --And.
>