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Indeed. "I have to close tonight" (vs. "I had to open this morning") means
unlocking, opening the store or business, and maybe also setting everything
up to start working.

stevo


On Fri, Jan 3, 2014 at 11:42 AM, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> It would surprise me to hear "Close the dog.", but if I heard "Close
> UP the dog." That would sound like perfectly good English to me.
>
> On the other hand, an employee might be asked to "close up" the store
> as well. While "Close the door." is perfectly fine, somehow "John,
> close the store." Doesn't sound quite complete to my ears, where
> "John, close up the store." sounds better. And yet "I close on
> Mondays." is something John might say about his job at the store.
>
> As a native speaker of seventy odd years I have to confess that
> English still baffles me sometimes.
>
> --gary
>
> On Fri, Jan 3, 2014 at 4:37 AM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > Hi!
> >
> > I would like to know about nat- and conlangs that have a single word
> > for the verbs "to close" and "to confine" and maybe "to lock" and "to
> > arrest".
> >
> > I have seen a children using the expression "close the dog" to refer
> > to the act of keeping the dog confined inside a room. "Close a dog"
> > sound as if the dog were in a surgery, but  so I realized that the two
> > situations is that in the former situation you obstruct the access to
> > the dog itself and in the latter one you obstruct the access to its
> > viscera.
> >
> > Até mais!
> >
> > Leonardo
>