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Russian has words like б (short for бы), в ('in'), ж (short for же), к
('toward'), с ('with'). They're single consonants, but they're treated as
separate words, and they all have full syllabic variants: бы, во, же, ко,
со.

stevo


On Fri, Jan 3, 2014 at 8:37 PM, H. S. Teoh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Fri, Jan 03, 2014 at 12:29:08PM -0800, Gary Shannon wrote:
> [...]
> > My rules defined a consonant sound as a consonant or cluster of
> > consonants (e.g. "s", "st", "str" are all single consonants) and a
> > vowel is whatever can follow a consonant. Since "m" is a consonant,
> > and since "you" can follow "m" (e.g. "music") then "you" is a vowel.
>
> Really? "m" a consonant? Hmmm... ;-)
>
> You forgot the syllabic consonants. [m=] is actually a *word* in my
> native language. Can a single consonant be a syllable, even a full
> *word*?
>
>
> [...]
> > True, there is no 1-to-1 mapping of letter to sound, but in all cases
> > (I contend) "y" maps to some vowel or another, never to a consonant.
>
> I contest your classifying letters (*ahem* sounds) like "m", "n", "r",
> "l", "v", "z", "f", etc., as consonants. There's nothing whatsoever
> wrong with the word "hmm", where "m" behaves like a vowel. I declare
> that therefore "m" in English can be both a consonant and a vowel. ;-)
>
> And what of "castle"? We all know the final "e" is silent, and thus the
> word really should be spelt "castl". That is, I contend, the "l" is a
> vowel.
>
> And if you live in the Northwest, you'd know words like "fatten" are
> pronounced without "e" in the second syllable, but it's pronounced more
> like "fatn". Therefore, I contend that "n" is also a vowel.
>
> And what of "pfft"? The "f" there is obviously a vowel, according to
> your definition. Therefore, "f" should not be called a consonant. ;-)
>
>
> > Of course, I suppose the word "consonant" could be defined so as to
> > include "y" as a consonant, but IMHO that's semantic gerrymandering.
> [...]
>
> I contend that defining "m", "l", "n", "f" as consonants is also
> semantic gerrymandering. Obviously, the word "hmm" has the vowel "m",
> the word "castle" has the vowel "l", the word "fatten" has the vowel
> "n", and the word "pfft" has the vowel "f". Calling them consonants in
> these words is the real semantic gerrymandering, I say. :-P
>
>
> T
>
> --
> Mediocrity has been pushed to extremes.
>