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> calendar reform.  Has anyone come up with some
> interesting proposals?  13 months a year?  19 days a week?  How about a
> month all of Fridays?
>
> Conversely, now would be a good time to discuss different calender schemes
> in our languages.  Anything exotic?  Weeks with three and a half days?

This is very interesting topic, although I suppose that it is suitable 
rather for conculture than conlang. But of course there are linguistic 
aspects of the calendar lore, for example the words for "weeks" of another 
length that 7, and the names of days of such weeks.

One of my calendars counts 6-day weeks associated with 6 basic hues, so the 
days may be named Cyanday, Greenday, Yellowday, Redday, Magentaday and 
Blueday; but maybe better is Argentday (silver or white replacing cyan, 
which is not a heraldic tincture), Vertday, Orday, Gulesday, Purpureday and 
Azureday. The week could be called "daybow", like "rainbow".
In Czech, the days are "stříbrnek, zelenek, zlatek, červenek, nachovek, 
modrek" ("-ek" like in OTL "čtvrtek, pátek"), and the months "stříbrnec, 
zelen, zelenec, zlat, zlatec, červen, červenec, nachov, nachovec, modr, 
modrec, stříbrn" ("-" and "-ec" like "červen, červenec", which exists also 
in OTL and were the inspiration for this calendar.
For English names of the month we could maybe use the "-math" from JRRT's 
Shire calendar, thus "Argentmathid, Vertmath, Vertmathid, Ormath, Ormathid, 
Gulesmath, Gulesmathid, Purpuremath, Purpuremathid, Azuremath, 
Argentmathid".
The odd months have 31 days and the even ones 30 days, so the Gulesmath and 
Gulesmathid began always at Gulesday, and so on. Years are 366 days long, 
consisting of 61 daybows or 6 bimesters, but the argent bimester is centered 
on the year boundary. The last daybow of an octaeteris is at the same time 
the first daybow of the next octaeteris, so the precision of this calendar 
is the same as of the Julian calendar.
At the beginning of the Indigo Age, the winter solstice was near the first 
day of the year, the Argentmathid 1st, called Great Argentday; and the 
summer solstice was near the Gulesmathid 1st, called Great Gulesday, but now 
the summer solstice is 23 days earlier, at Gulesmath 8th. (The vernal 
equinox was near the Great Limenight, between Vertmathid 31st and Ormath 
1st; the autumnal equinox was near the Great Indigonight, between 
Purplemathid 31st and Azuremath 1st.)

In the Chiropotamia / Riverhand, the calendar counts 5-day weeks, called 
dayhand. The names of days of a dayhand are Thumbday, Indexday, Midleday, 
Ringday and Littleday. Each year has 365 days and after a period of 20 
years, an intercalary dayhand is inserted.