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On 2 Feb 2014 17:35, "Leonardo Castro" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> 2014-02-02 Jeffrey Daniel Rollin-Jones <[log in to unmask]>:
> > The Finnish and Germans are notorious for refusing to speak their
> > respective native languages with foreigners; I have direct experience of
> > the latter.
>
> But is that something like "you won't be able to follow me in my
> language, we'd better speak in English" or "you are not allowed to
> speak our noble language"?

Is there a difference? If I start off addressing them in German, I think
it's extremely rude to refuse to use the same language. I even have the
experience of someone refusing point blank to do so even when explicitly
asked, without the courtesy of an explanation. And if it is the case that
my German is execrable, then (a) as someone else pointed out on this list
it's certainly not going to improve if I can't talk to anyone in it, and
(b) what if neither of us spoke English or, as in my house where my two
co-tenants so far have been, respectively, Japanese and Chinese, we have to
make do in English because whilst their English is not great, it's
certainly better than my Japanese or Mandarin.

>
> 2014-02-02 David McCann <[log in to unmask]>:
> > On Sun, 2 Feb 2014 11:49:51 +0100
> > Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> >> Do you know, in History, some examples of peoples that didn't like
> >> other people to speak their languages?
> >
> > I've read that it's not good form to address a local in Papua-New
> > Guinea in Tok Pisin, at least in towns. It would suggest that you
> > thought they were the sort of person who couldn't speak English. That
> > is not the same thing, though, as it's not likely to be their own
> > language, since there are few native speakers.
> >
> > The Hindi example is interesting. To judge by the often
> > incomprehensible English of some Indian posters at Linux Questions, I'd
> > have thought that those people, at least, would be very relieved at not
> > having to speak it.
>
> BTW, I have noted that the expression "to do well" in very common in
> Indian forums in English, in sentences like "economically, southern
> states are doing well". Is that expression common for you too, other
> native English speakers?
>
> Até mais!
>
> Leonardo