Print

Print


Paul Bartlett skrev 2014-02-14 17:32:
> On Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:48:33 
> -0500, Kjell Rehnström 
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Hi you all!
>> When reading a shorter text in 
>> Interlingua it suddenly struck 
>> me that both LsF and Interlingua 
>> IALA use the words taken from 
>> Latin in the ablative case. And 
>> yes, I know that this is not the 
>> whole truth, at least not for 
>> Interlingua, and I know as well 
>> that for Latino sine Flexione 
>> Peano really selected the 
>> ablative case of Classical 
>> Latin. At the same time the 
>> choice of a simplified Latin had 
>> as a reason that there already 
>> do exist dictionaries to most 
>> vernaculars. Buth then, why not 
>> take a shorcut and use the 
>> nominative of the Latin words.
>> [...]
>
> My understanding has always been 
> that in European languages which 
> have many modern words 
> originating in Latin, the greater 
> part of them were/are formed on 
> the oblique stem, not the 
> nominative form, and many of them 
> are similar to the ablative to 
> begin with. So it was largely a 
> matter of familiarity for 
> west-European speakers. (This 
> even applies to some extent to 
> English speakers.) Also, singular 
> ablatives end in a vowel, which 
> can often contribute to 
> consonant/vowel alternation, 
> providing a sort of euphony.
>
Could it be that Peano was 
influence by his own Italian 
language? This is an interesting 
point we might discuss in the 
future. I realise I've got to test 
this more to understand the whole 
problem.

Kjell R