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Maybe it's my programmer's instinct for logical progression, but if I were
to develop a syntactical use of postpositions in this manner, I would
probably use a form of stop (something that is less harsh than a comma or
an em-dash) that could help determine what is the object.
"She lived a cottage IN* the edge on* a great forest OF(*)."
"She went work TO* noon At* tea AFTER*."
-Schade


On Sun, Feb 9, 2014 at 12:09 AM, Ph. D. <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 2/8/2014 11:56 PM, Gary Shannon wrote:
>
>> I've never studied a language that uses postpositions instead of
>> prepositions. I can't quite warp my head around how that must work I take
>> the sentence fragment: "IN a cottage ON the edge OF a great forest" and if
>> I use postpositions I come up with "a cottage the edge a great forest OF
>> ON
>> IN" That just looks like RPN, and I'm sure that's not how it's done in a
>> real natlang.
>>
>> So can somebody help me out with what word order you would find for a
>> sentence like "She lived in a cottage on the edge of a great forest."
>> using
>> postpositions? The only postposition I can think of in English is "ago".
>> (If it were a preposition then "ago three years" would be a perfectly good
>> prepositional phrase, so I'm assuming it's a postposition. Or am I wrong
>> about that?)
>>
>> --gary
>>
>
> I believe the postposition comes after its object, not at the end of the
> sentence.
>
> "She lived a cottage IN the edge ON a great forest OF."
>
> "She went to work at noon after tea." -> "She went work TO noon AT tea
> AFTER."
>
> --Ph. D.
>