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On 8 Feb 2014 21:38, "C. Brickner" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> No, these are not case endings in a noun declension. They are adverbial
suffixes added to a noun to make it an adverb.  An example in English would
be to add the adverbial suffix -ward to the noun 'heaven' turning it into
the adverb 'heavenward'.

I believe in this case at least, one would still use the term locative, but
as in "locative adverb", rather than "locative case". Presumably the same
would apply for the other terms I mentioned.

> Charlie
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Jeffrey Daniel Rollin-Jones" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Saturday, February 8, 2014 4:03:45 PM
> Subject: Re: Types of numbers
>
> On 8 Feb 2014 16:59, "C. Brickner" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > Senjecas also has three adverbial suffixes indicating location at,
> location to, and location from.   It is used with nouns, both common and
> proper: (at) home, from home, (to) home; in/at Paris, to Paris, from
Paris.
>   I call these adverbs of nominal location.   Does anyone have a better,
> less cumbersome name?
> > Charlie
>
> Those are usually called locatives, I believe; though the term does double
> duty for the "at" member, especially where it is part of a case system;
the
> others are, respectively, allative (to) and ablative (from). Allative is
> also sometimes called dative (or vice versa) if the same case marks the
> indirect object.
>
> HTH,
>
> Jeff