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On 13 Feb 2014 15:07, "Herman Miller" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> The writers weren't always consistent with Yoda's syntax. "Help them you
could, but you would destroy all for which they have fought and suffered".
>
> Personally I rationalize that as Yoda's way of underscoring the
importance of what he has to say. He consciously adopts human speech
patterns to contrast with his native word order. But it could be that the
writers just slipped up.
>
> Or maybe they tried the correct word order and it just sounded funny or
confusing to them. "Help them you could, but destroy all you would, for
which fought and suffered they have."

Yoda uses VP-fronting. Relative clauses, as in "All for which they have
fought and suffered", can't contain VP-fronting because the "for which"
already occupies the slot for the fronted element. (Nor does English allow
VP-fronting with pied-piping, so "all fought and suffered for which they
have" is illicit.) Yoda could have said "but destroy all for which they
have fought and suffered you would", but instead he follows the universal
principle of placing heavier phrases later in the clause.

And.