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Is factitatun not a form of factitare? (Cf canere, cantare, cantitare) (I
ask out of ignorance rather than intent to correct.)

But yes, who could fail to love Latin inflectional morphology...
On 19 Mar 2014 04:08, "Siva Kalyan" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Iterative (or frequentative).
>
> My favorite example (from Cicero): *Quando hoc non factitatum est?* 'When
> was this not commonly done?' (with reference to young men's habit
> of misbehaving in some particular way).
>
> The Latin frequentative is formed by taking the perfect participle, and
> deriving a 1st-conjugation verb from it, thus: *facere* 'do' >
> *factum*'done' >
> *factare* 'to do over and over; do habitually'. *Factitatum* is thus the
> perfect participle of a *double frequentative* (i.e. it contains *three
> layers* of perfect participles!)! Though now that I think about it,
> shouldn't it be **factatatum*?
>
> Siva
>
> On 19 March 2014 12:39, Guilherme Santos <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Just to save the creation a a new thread, what is the name of the aspect
> > that means to do something over and over again?
> >
> >
> > 2014-03-18 14:13 GMT-03:00 Guilherme Santos <[log in to unmask]>:
> >
> > > In my Japanese classes i learnt te-form as te-form, but when explaining
> > it
> > > the teacher always said it works in most places like a 'gerúndio'
> > >
> > > >a tenseless, linking form meaning "after
> > > >having done..." or "do... and then", intriguingly similar to what
> > > Guilherme
> > > >describes in the OP, and not unlike the Japanese -te form in meaning
> > >
> > > You just ANADEW'd me. I guess you can't really make original
> grammatical
> > > features and keep it naturalistic
> > >
> > >
> > > 2014-03-18 13:55 GMT-03:00 R A Brown <[log in to unmask]>:
> > >
> > > On 18/03/2014 16:38, Roman Rausch wrote:
> > >>
> > >>> In the Romance languages, derivatives of the Latin
> > >>>> "gerundium" are used to mean a converb, so the Japanese
> > >>>> terminology probably comes from that.
> > >>>>
> > >>>
> > >>> Yes, the first descriptions of the language were written
> > >>> by Portuguese Jesuits in the 17th century and they named
> > >>> it like that based on the Portuguese gerund (gerúndio).
> > >>>
> > >>> Wikipedia gives P. _ele trabalha cantando_ 'he works
> > >>> while singing' as an example sentence, which would be
> > >>> exactly paralleled by J. _utatte hatarku_. So that's at
> > >>> least for simultaneous actions.
> > >>>
> > >>
> > >> That makes perfect sense.  Tho in the "high Classical" Latin of people
> > >> like Cicero, the ablative of the gerund had a instrumental or
> causative
> > >> meaning, "by doing X....", in the Latin of the Empire we find it used
> to
> > >> express concomitant action, i.e. _cantando laborat_ = he works while
> > >> singing.
> > >>
> > >> That is the origin of the Portuguese use; similar use is found AFAIK
> in
> > >> Spanish and Italian.  It's been around for a couple of millennia   ;)
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> Ray
> > >> ==================================
> > >> http://www.carolandray.plus.com
> > >> ==================================
> > >> "Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
> > >> wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
> > >> [J.G. Hamann, 1760]
> > >> "A mind that thinks at its own expense
> > >> will always interfere with language".
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
>