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Apparently, some people measure how good they speak a foreign language by
how fast they can speak it. When we get used to a particular accent, it
becomes easier. For instance, there are hispanophones that speak French
quickly but using [e] for /E/ and [b] for /v/, but, since I know how their
mother tongue works, I can figure out the appropriate correspondences. But
what about a Tamil person you just met speaking speed French with strong
foreign accent?
Em 26/03/2014 16:01, "Guilherme Santos" <[log in to unmask]> escreveu:

> Interestingly, i am more annoyed when people mispronounce words in English
> than in Portuguese, but i agree with Jeffrey (the most heinous mistake is
> when people pronounce "th" as a plain "t")
>
>
> 2014-03-26 11:43 GMT-03:00 Jeffrey Daniel Rollin-Jones <
> [log in to unmask]>:
>
> > Someone who mispronounces, slowly! (This actually happens!). To answer
> > your original question, the latter, though I guess it depends *how bad*
> the
> > mispronunciation is. Someone who pronounces "th" as "s" ithn't tho bad,
> but
> > someo who thi the en o wor a option----AAAAARGH!!!!
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> > > On 26 Mar 2014, at 14:28, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > What do you find less annoying: a foreigner that speaks very slowly
> while
> > > trying to pronounce phonemes carefully, or another that speaks in
> normal
> > > velocity while mispronouncing a lot of words?
> > >
> > > In my own case of Brazilian living in France, sometimes I'm undecided
> > > between speeding up or not. Should I bother to speed up my speech or
> let
> > it
> > > speed up naturally (after a lot of months maybe)?
> >
>