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Well, thanks for those pointers. I've also had a look at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontic_Greek_language
and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsakonian_language

Any Slavonic linguists on the list interested in taking a look at Pontic Greek
in relation to Russian and Ukrainian?(Though that's just a part of the possible
sprachbund influences - Georgian influences on Pontic would also be interesting :)

Wesley Parish

Quoting R A Brown <[log in to unmask]>:

> On 28/03/2014 08:07, Pete Bleackley wrote:
> > staving R A Brown:
> [snip]
> > On 27/03/2014 23:16, Wesley Parish wrote:
> >> It would be useful to see the surviving Italian Greek
> >> dialects in comparison to modern Greek and the
> >> surrounding Italian dialects.
> >
> > Very wise words IMO.
> > ==============================================================
> >
> > Indeed. I'd like to know more about these.
> 
> These might be places to start:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griko_dialect
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calabrian_Greek_dialect
> 
> and follow up links.
> ======================================================
> 
> On 28/03/2014 09:18, Daniel Prohaska wrote:
> > Great idea!! Perhaps contact forms with Gaulish? Even
> > survival of the latter in the area?
> >
> > For modern survivals of Greek non-finite forms, check
> > this out…
> >
> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcAYP4irSyQ+
> 
> Very interesting.
> 
> Greek did survive in various places, cf.
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hellenic_languages
> 
> -- 
> Ray
> ==================================
> http://www.carolandray.plus.com
> ==================================
> "Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
> wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
> [J.G. Hamann, 1760]
> "A mind that thinks at its own expense
> will always interfere with language".
>