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Well, assuming it retained its independence longer etc, it would've been a Greek outlier amongst a flood 
of Occitan dialects forming a sprachbund with them, so its sound changes would've been consistent 
with the Occitan sound changes. (Of course, if it had retained autnonomy for significantly longer, there 
is a fair chance that the Massalian Greek dialect area would've followed the Mediterranean coast some 
of the distance to teh (modern) Italian and Spanish borders. FWLIW )

Wesley Parish

Quoting Pete Bleackley <[log in to unmask]>:

> I've been thinking again about how Greek might have developed had it
> survived in Massalia. A suitable alt-history might be that Massalia
> backed Caesar rather than Pompey in the Civil War, hence retaining its
> independence longer and having a greater degree of autonomy when it was
> absorbed into the Roman Empire. (As there are surviving Greek dialects
> in Italy, this doesn't seem too much of a stretch).
> 
> I'm not going to try to apply French sound changes to Koine Greek - that
> simply doesn't make sense. Instead, I've had a look a passage of Koine
> Greek and tried to work out some plausible-seeming sound changes. What
> do you think of the following (CXS)?
> 
> En arxe en o lojos gE o lojos en pros don TEon gE o lojos en TEos. udos
> en En arxe pros don TEon. bant jenedo Di aBtu gE xoris aBtu uDE En
> jenedo o jonEn. En aBto en zoe gE e zoe en do Pos don anTrobon. ge do
> Pos PEni En de kodi gE e kodi u gadElaBen aBto.
> 
> --
> Pete
> The Fantastical Devices of Pete The Mad Scientist -
> http://fantasticaldevices.blogspot.com
>