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There are Brits who would strenuously deny that they pronounce "tower" and "tar" virtually, if not absolutely, the same even though some of them do. I'm not sure what "creaky voice/vocal fry" refer to but, if I'm right, I know at least one Finn who uses it in Finnish but not in English. I don't find it objectionable. 

My 2p

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> On 25 Mar 2014, at 00:46, Larry Sulky <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> As a Canadian-American, I am all too aware of vocal fry on both sides of
> the border and am mightily thankful that neither my daughter nor my son
> (both in their twenties) use it. I have a few American colleagues who do
> and it begins to grate in approximately 1 minute and 44 seconds. I can
> therefore guarantee that I will not be adopting this feature, ever, ever,
> ever.
> 
> 
>> On 24 March 2014 20:38, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I've been reading some articles about "vocal fry" or "creaky voice"
>> becoming a distinctive feature of American accent, more pronounced in young
>> females but not limited to them. I wonder if you Americans of this list
>> have already adopted this feature.
>> 
>> 
>> http://news.sciencemag.org/social-sciences/2011/12/vocal-fry-creeping-u.s.-speech
>> 
>> http://www.thewire.com/national/2011/12/vocal-fry-isnt-just-college-girls/46063/
>> http://americanspeech.dukejournals.org/content/85/3/315
>> 
>> http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2013/01/lexicon_valley_on_creaky_voice_or_vocal_fry_in_young_american_women.html
>> 
>> Até mais!
>> 
>> Leonardo
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day I
> can hear her breathing. -- Arundhati Roy*