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"miss out". I'd have used "leave out". Interesting difference.

stevo


On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 at 8:04 PM, Jeff Daniel Rollin-Jones <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> No, it means that *initial* /h/ is not a phoneme in the Cockney dialect of
> English; but you can't, for example, miss out the /h/ in such words as
> "ahoy".
>
> Jeff
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On 27 Mar 2014, at 19:34, Siva Kalyan <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> > Whoa! Does that mean /h/ isn't a phoneme in English (or is only
> marginally
> > one)?
> >
> > Reminds me of the "demonstration" that h and eng are allophones of each
> > other...
> >
> > Siva
> >
> > 2014年3月28日金曜日、Jeff Daniel Rollin-Jones<[log in to unmask]>さんは書きました:
> >
> >> That's a good way of putting it, yes. Missing /h/, for example, works
> >> because there's no "real" word "orse", "ospital", etc to compete with.
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >>
> >>>> On 27 Mar 2014, at 14:50, Guilherme Santos <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:;>>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Basically you have to do some sort of contrast wherever there is a
> >> contrast
> >>> in the language you are speaking, even if you contrast the wrong
> sounds.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> 2014-03-27 11:25 GMT-03:00 Jeff Daniel Rollin-Jones <
> >> [log in to unmask] <javascript:;>>:
> >>>
> >>>> No, on the contrary, I don't mind that. As someone else said, the most
> >>>> heinous mistake is when phonemes are missed out altogether! To miss
> out
> >> one
> >>>> in particular (like /h/, as in the Cockney of London) is
> >> inconsequential;
> >>>> to miss out several (say, because your native language has few or no
> >>>> consonantal codas) is disastrous!
> >>>>
> >>>> Jeff
> >>>>
> >>>> Sent from my iPhone
> >>>>
> >>>>>> On 27 Mar 2014, at 14:09, "G. van der Vegt" <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:;>
> >>>
> >>>>> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> On 26 March 2014 16:01, Guilherme Santos <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:;>>
> >> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Interestingly, i am more annoyed when people mispronounce words in
> >>>> English
> >>>>>> than in Portuguese, but i agree with Jeffrey (the most heinous
> mistake
> >>>> is
> >>>>>> when people pronounce "th" as a plain "t")
> >>>>> Depending on the word in question <th> tends to come out as /t/ /d/
> /f/
> >>>> or
> >>>>> /v/ in my accent. Just because I know how these words are supposed to
> >> be
> >>>>> pronounced doesn't mean I have an easy time pronouncing those blasted
> >>>>> phonemes.
> >>
>