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Very good points Dr. Flood.  I did although want to make one correction...

The EM RRC requires a minimum of 16% 'pediatric experience'.  They equate a dedicated pediatric month (PedED, PICU, Peds Wards etc) to 4%.  This means that the bare minimum of pediatric exposure for board eligibility through ABEM is an equivalent of 4 months.  (sorry for splitting hairs but wanted to make sure the correct info went out).  Few EM programs are at the minimum and most are comfortably in excess.  

Personal opinion is that I don't think allowing a minimum of 16% is enough since national studies have shown that an ~27% of ED volume is minors (<17 yo) most of which are seen in general ED's.  (emphasizing the need to get solid ped training to our primarily adult care colleagues).

Great discussion string.  Thx to the group.  
Dale


 ________________________________________
From: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Robert Flood [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 3:30 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Adult patients in the PED

Dear Dr. Chavda:

With respect to PEM trained physicians, it is a scope of practice issue, as
defined by your medical staff credentials committee and your own personal
comfort level in managing adults.

Still, since all PEM fellowships require at least 2-3 months of adult
experience, one could argue that all PEM Fellowship Trained physicians have
had adult experience and expertise. After all, our Adult EM trained
colleagues are required to do only 3 months of pediatrics in a 3 year
residency, and then are privileged to care for children who present to EDs
throughout the country.

Most malpractice coverage is all encompassing for all ED Emergencies so
that you are indeed covered to manage all patients under the EMTALA
standard. Still, you might want to check with your specific carrier if you
have any concerns.

Whether PEM physicians CAN care for adults is not so much in question as
much as SHOULD PEM physicians care for these older patients, and I am not
sure you will get a clear answer from the PEM community.

Bob Flood






On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Chavda, Kamal <[log in to unmask]
> wrote:

> Hi  Dr. Flood,
>
>
> The question is not about patient showing up to a pediatric ED. That part
> is clear---If they show up all they need is screening exam and transfer
> them appropriately.
>
> The question was --- Hospitals where the pediatric and adult ED are
> adjacent to each other (separated by doors) the management at several
> institutions wants pediatric ED to take some of adult ED patients to ease
> the flow and waiting times etc ( Not to mention- improve customer service
> satisfaction- PG score)
>
>
> I had to do that sometimes out of courtesy for my adult ED colleagues when
> they got slammed ( did so very reluctantly and cherry picked patients)
>
> Other than not wanting to see adults as we chose to do pediatrics, my
> question would be.......
>
> If one is PEM trained  ---What does your malpractice insurance say in
> terms of age? Does it specify age?  In the event of a law suit could you be
> on your own?
>
>
> KKC,MD
>
> ________________________________________
> From: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Discussion List [
> [log in to unmask]] on behalf of Robert Flood [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 3:02 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Adult patients in the PED
>
> Hi everyone:
>
> Regardless of the age range you care for in your ED, this entire
> conversation really focuses on two issues: Scope of Practice and EMTALA.
>
> EMTALA reigns supreme on all issues as it pertains to EM. As a physician in
> an ED, you must provide stabilization to the best of your hospital's and
> your personal capabilities. Since the training, expertise and experience of
> EM physicians vary greatly, everyone should keep these simple principles in
> mind.
>
> As such, I give the following advice to my staff:
>
> 1) All adult patients who present for care in our ED must have an EMTALA
> screening examination.
> 2) The extent of that screening examination is determined by your
> hospital's and your personal level of comfort of managing that patient to
> the point of Discharge or Transfer.
>
> For those who feel really uncomfortable managing adult patients, the extent
> of the medical screening will be much less than for say me, who trained in
> adult medicine.
>
> Lets not make this more complicated than it needs to be.
>
> Just my two cents.
>
> Bob Flood
> Division Director, PEM
> Cardinal Glennon, St. Louis
>
>
> On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 11:02 AM, Marjan Askar <[log in to unmask]
> >wrote:
>
> > I just wanted to point out that suturing a 30 year old May not be
> > different than the 15 year old, but the bottom line is that those of us
> who
> > chose to do a pediatric emergency fellowship following a pediatric
> > residency, are PEDIATRIC sub specialists.
> > We CHOOSE not to see adults .
> > Same argument goes for a heart surgeon performing general surgery .  Are
> > the able to and trsined? Yes
> > They CHOOSE not to.
> > This issue comes up where I work all the time.
> > In the era of see as many patients as quickly as you can and keep
> patients
> > satisfied , physician satisfaction with what they do is forgotten .
> > I simply CHOOSE to take care of kids.  This is what satisfies me.
> >
> > Marjan Askar
> > Lake Forest, IL
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> > > On Apr 21, 2014, at 7:46 PM, "Linzer, Jeffrey F" <[log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > Not to drag up too many old issues, but PEM's are emergency physicians
> > first. Yes, everyone who came up the peds track did only four months of
> > adult time and that won't make you an expert in figuring out whether to
> > start TPA on that 52 year-old who is having an evolving stroke or not.
> > However, I think doing a laceration repair on a relatively healthy 40
> > year-old isn't that much different than a 15 year-old.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > That said, the only "legal" issue is what services you are credentialed
> > by the hospital to perform (other than the occasional emergency surprise
> > that may so up at your door). If you work in a dual ED (adults and kids
> in
> > the same basic area), then the hospital is responsible for making sure
> you
> > are qualified to perform/provide services to certain patients. The
> > breakdown of peds care ending at 15, 17, 20 or 25 is purely artificial
> and
> > based on your specific hospital's policies. In fact the AAP recognizes
> > "young adults" (to age 26) under the purview of pediatrics (Guiding
> > principles for managed care arrangements for the health care of newborns,
> > infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Pediatrics
> > 2013;132;e1452).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > So with that said, as long as the hospital has said your are qualified
> > to perform a service (and your malpractice carrier agrees) than you can
> go
> > ahead and provide the service.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Just my 2₵
> > >
> > > Jeff
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Jeffrey Linzer Sr., MD, FAAP, FACEP
> > > Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine
> > > Emory University School of Medicine
> > > Associate Medical Director for Compliance
> > > EPG/Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
> > > Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
> > >
> > > [cid:[log in to unmask]]
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Discussion List [mailto:
> > [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lisa A Drago
> > > Sent: Monday, April 21, 2014 3:13 PM
> > > To: [log in to unmask]
> > > Subject: Adult patients in the PED
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Recently our adult colleagues have been requesting the PEM docs see
> > young adults ( under 30) when their volume becomes unbearable. Any PEM
> docs
> > seeing young adults in your practice and legally how are you handling
> this
> > (separate hospital privileges?)
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask]<mailto:
> > [log in to unmask]> with the message: info PED-EM-L The URL for
> > the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
> > >
> > >                 http://listserv.brown.edu/ped-em-l.html
> > >
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For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask] with the message: info PED-EM-L
The URL for the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
                 http://listserv.brown.edu/ped-em-l.html