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You are right in that it requires no special materials. However, to me it
is more of a question of scale – what if I want to write something a bit
more substantial? A chronicles maybe? Doing it on a ratio of one word per
fire seems highly impractical for one set of reasons. Doing it on a larger
scale seems highly impractical for a whole other set of reasons. A whole
paragraph written in sand? One second of clumsiness and it's all effed up.
Manuscripts are loaded with errors already as it is.

Ingus


2014-04-16 22:37 GMT+02:00 Matthew DeBlock <[log in to unmask]>:

> Really? you must not have seen Nailscript then.
>
> Iron nails take alot of more energy and resources to produce, and nailing
> them takes alot more effort
>
> It would be better to use sticks and kindling to burn, but I didn’t want
> to start a camp-fire in my house.
>
> Its more just meant for considering "what if" a writing system evolved
> this way. It could be more efficient in some ways, depending on the
> resources available.
>
> use leather or bark instead of paper, and it requires NO special materials
> or tools, just sand, your finger, and fire
>
>
> Dustinger Batailleur <[log in to unmask]>
> >That's the least efficient writing system I've ever seen.
>
>
> On 16 April 2014 10:00, Matthew DeBlock <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > http://youtu.be/_GfEKOH1Y_o
> >  (Yay.. I didn't burn down the house hehe)
> >
> > still a fresh experiment, but first tests seem promising :) (see you-tube
> > video above)
> >
> > No water or ink required, just paper, sand and fire.
> > Could probably be done to leather, cloth, even wood, but wood would
> > require a longer hotter burn to singe.
> > The writing is water proof, once made, there is no ink, so it wont run or
> > smudge no matter how wet it gets. Also, because crossing lines "cuts" the
> > previous line, there might be some cool ways to use that in a script.
> >
> > Cover paper with sand, wipe lines in it with a stick, fingers or
> anything,
> > and set a small fire on top.
> > The paper will singe, but the sand will prevent it from burning, and
> > control singing to the line due to heat sinking and controlled oxygen
> flow.
> > Also, from my basic chemistry understanding, I imagine the vapors from
> the
> > burning material are leaving some residue that stains the paper.
> > Burning paper kinda sucks, had to do multiple burns cause it burns so
> > fast, but the ash builds up, when I try to remove the ash in between
> burns
> > it disturbs the sand and exposes some areas a bit:(
> >
> > I think it will work much better with small burning sticks laid just
> above
> > the sand .Build up the edges a bit so they don't actually lie on the
> > "drawing surface" but instead are just above it. (not too keen on the
> idea
> > of starting a small camp-fire in my house lol, but using sticks for one
> > long burn and not poking around should improve the quality)
> >
> > The last image in the video shows the carbon marks left on the floor
> > beneath the paper. They wipe off easily, but it would seem that if I try
> > with several layers of paper I might be able to produce multiple copies
> at
> > once. Primitive "carbon copies" hehe
> >
> > Not sure what to call it, yet thinking something like "blazing sand
> > script" or “FireScript” or even “SandScript” (though that might be easily
> > confused for Sanskrit) hehe..
> > Also, If this was how a culture started their writing system I can
> imagine
> > it evolving into tons of other methods eg, pouring molten material into
> > sand molds, filling with powder that melts with heat then congeals, etc..
> > so the writing system could be integrated into many other arts and crafts
> > as it evolves
> >
> > The medium of lines in sand is fun. As Alex pointed out in the thread
> > about Nailscript, crossing lines in clay like cuneiform might be able to
> > distinguish depth layer to some extend as well. This sand is a similar
> case
> > that demonstrates that concept I think. Although this takes it to the
> > “extreme” because the sand actually cuts the previous like and leaves 2
> > “walls” on either side of the second stroke. Varying stroke width,
> > specifically, using increasingly thin strokes should allow multiple
> > crossings in one location.
> >
> > Maybe when I find a beach where fires are permitted, or when I finally
> > move back to North-America and have a back yard, I can develop it
> further.
> >
> > Since I have now put it on the back burner, sharing it, maybe someone
> else
> > has the means and ideas for a next step or some application.
> >
> > Hope you guys like :)
> >
>