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Those needles are sturdy and  long.

I once epipen'd my daughter back when she was a skinny 6 yo.  I'm sure it was a periosteal dose.  It worked though.

A few thoughts for advising people:
1. hold the child's leg firmly
2. for skinny little kids, bunch up the thigh muscle to allow for penetration depth (half-inch needle length plus tissue compression as you push)
3. hold device against thigh and push rather than swing and slam like some instructions say

I've never heard of a lac before but can imagine it happening.  Getting daycares and schools to appreciate that using epi injectors is harder than it looks, and that practice helps, is a project of mine.

Take care,
D.J.


________________________________________
From: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Brown, Julie C. [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 11:32 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Epi-pens and leg lacerations

I recently treated a 4-year-old for a large thigh laceration after a daycare provider used an epi-pen. The exact circumstances are unclear, but I assume the needle was held compressed and the patient moved his leg.

Has anyone else seen this happen?

Julie Brown

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