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From a personal/anecdotal perspective: I had been a Loglan speaker since
about 1978. When the "great schism" occurred, I found the dispute to be
completely disenchanting, and I turned to other linguistic pursuits. My
point is: If you are trying to promote use of your language, initiating
feuds and legal disputes is perhaps the worst possible means. So, even if
you can get a copyright/trademark on your conlang, is it worth it to try to
protect it?



On Tue, May 6, 2014 at 9:46 AM, Sai <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I've posted various patents to the list before. Also, here's the one
> actual legal case I know of, Loglan Institute v. Logical Language
> Group, 962 F. 2d 1038 (Fed. Cir. 1992):
>
> http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=2688813515825602229
>
> I'd appreciate if anyone who knows of any conlang related case law,
> trademarks, or registered copyright claims would post 'em to this
> thread so I can collate a list.
>
> (Note: copyright doesn't have to be registered, but it is an optional
> thing that's possible to do. My interest is in whether anyone's gotten
> a government to agree to register a _language_, rather than e.g. a
> _primer_, as having copyright.)
>
> Registered trademarks are also interesting of course, though not
> nearly as much unless someone's tried to trademark every word in their
> lexicon. ;-) (Otherwise it's more likely to be a primarily a
> run-of-the-mill movie/book related trademark, which isn't as
> interesting.)
>
> Thanks,
> Sai
>