Print

Print


Which is what I was thinking after my first, "Oh, yeah, warrior means
arms+weapons" moment.  The whole passage is about how strong Gilgamesh is
and how only Enkidu is strong enough to wrestle him and how between the two
of them they just about knock the city flat.  I don't believe weapons come
into (this part of) the story at all.  But I wanted to be sure, since, even
with the context, the other (arms=weapons) reading is possible.  The
Portuguese translation makes me think that this is the wrong translation,
but I'd still like to know what the original Sumerian (or at least the
Akkadian) says here...if anyone happens to know.  If not I'll just go with
appendages and proceed with my translation.



On Thu, May 1, 2014 at 5:51 PM, Sylvia Sotomayor <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I am fairly sure that arms here is shorthand for strength of the arms, as I
> think Gilgamesh is wrestling with others.
>
>
> On Thu, May 1, 2014 at 3:50 PM, Guilherme Santos <[log in to unmask]
> >wrote:
>
> > Portuguese does not conflate those meanings. In the translation i found
> > that line is translated as "Gilgamesh correu o mundo, mas, até chegar a
> > Uruk, não encontrou quem pudesse opor-se à força de seus braços"
> > 'withstand his arms' is translated as "opor-se à força de seus braços",
> > which would be literally 'oppose to the strenght of his arms(upper
> > appendages)'.
> > This translation may be freer than necessary to actually define which one
> > the Sumerians meant, but, if you take that into consideration, you may
> want
> > to use the 'upper appendages' word.
> >
> >
> > 2014-05-01 19:24 GMT-03:00 Adam Walker <[log in to unmask]>:
> >
> > > I decided to translate a section of the Gilgamesh in to Gravgaln, but I
> > > have run across a vocab problem in the first line of the section I'm
> > > working one.  It's in the section on the coming of Enkidu.  The
> > translation
> > > I'm working from says:
> > >
> > > Gilgamesh went abroad in the world, but he met with none who could
> > > withstand his arms till he came to Uruk.
> > >
> > > Normally, in the context of warriors and such, I would go with
> > > arms=weapons, but the fact that the story quickly proceeds to Gilgamesh
> > > beating the crap out of every one and the gods making Enkidu who then
> > > wrestles with Gilgamesh till they nearly knock the city down, I got to
> > > wondering if, in this case, arms=upper appendages.  Does anyone here
> > > speak/read Akkadian or Sumerian?  What is the word here translated as
> > arms?
> > >  Which sort of arm does it mean?  Or does it have the same polysemy as
> > the
> > > English word?  Failing that, does anyone have access to a translation
> in
> > a
> > > language that does NOT conflate the two meanings?
> > >
> > > Adam the confuzzled
> > >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Sylvia Sotomayor
>
> The sooner I fall behind the more time I have to catch up.
>