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The Heidel and the Dalley translations also seem to have weapon rather
than appendage there. That makes me wonder if the Portuguese was
translated from the Penguin version rather than the original
languages. Or if the Akkadian word really does have the same solysemy.
 Such fractatious pondermentation!

Adam who nakes up words

On 5/1/14, Puey McCleary <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> ‚ÄčAdam, it looks like the translation of Gilgamesh that you are using may be
> the Penguin Classic version, by NK Sandars.  In my version "The Coming of
> Enkidu," is on page 60.  On page 49, in the introduction (and on the
> following), the author explains how he smooths out the various translations
> and versions to create a clear prose version for modern readers.  So, it is
> possible that the phrase "withstand his arms," may be slight editorial
> jiggery-pokery.
>
> Here's the paragraph in the Penguin version:
>
> Gilgamesh went abroad in the world, but he met with none who could
> withstand his arms till he returned to Uruk.  But the men of Uruk muttered
> in their houses, "Gilgamesh sounds the tocsin for his amusement, his
> arrogance has no bounds by day or night.  No son is left with his father,
> for Gilgamesh takes them all; yet the king should be a shepherd to his
> people.  His lust leaves no virgin to her lover, neither the warrior's
> daughter nor the wife of the noble; yet this is the shepherd of the city,
> wise, comely, and resolute."
>
> I have a literal verse translation of the Akkadian version, by Maureen
> Kovacs. Under tablet one, I find this (I'm omitting the line numbers):
>
> He [Gilgamesh] walks around in the enclosure of Uruk,
> like a wild bull he makes himself mighty, head raised (over others).
> There is no rival who can raise his weapon against him.
> His fellows stand (at the alert), attentive to his (orders?),
> and the men of Uruk become anxious in ...
> Gilgamesh does not leave a son to his father,
> day and night he arrogantly (?) ...
> **
> Is Gilgamesh the shepherd of Uruk-Haven,
> is he the shepherd ...
> bold, eminent, knowing, and wise?
> Gilgamesh does not leave a girl to her mother (?)!
> The daughter of the warrior, the bride of the young man,
> the gods kept hearing their complaints, so
> the gods of the heavens implored the Lord of Uruk [Anu]:
> "You have indeed brought into being a mighty wild bull, head raised!
> There is no rival who can raise a weapon against him.
> His fellows stand (at the alert), attentive to his (orders?),
> Gilgamesh does not leave a son to his father,
> day and night he arrogantly ...
> Is he the shepherd of Uruk-Haven,
> is he their shepherd ...
> bold, eminent, knowing, and wise?
> Gilgamesh does not leave a girl to her mother(?)!
>
> ##
>
> Alas, I cannot quite find this exact passage in Roger Cheesbro's Klingon
> translation (ghIlghameS), though the introduction contains bits that are
> similar:
>
> 'uruqDaq bogh
> Sub ghaH, nanbogh targh naS,
> 'etDaq yIt, DevwI'.
> ghot'u' QanwI'.
>
> He was born of Uruk.
> He, a goring wild boar, was a hero;
> a leader, he walked in front;
> protector of people.
>
> Later on ...
>
> 'IH
> ghaH 'IH law' Hoch loD 'IH puS
> pup
> jen nachDaj, Hem, HoS
> ghaHDaq nuH peplaH pagh ghol
> 'uruq DunmoH ghaH
> veng Dun
>
> He was beautiful.
> He was the most handsome man.
> He was perfect.
> His head raised, proud, strong.
> No opponent could raise a weapon to him.
> He made Uruk great.
> A wonderful city.
>
> I look forward to the Gravgaln version!
>