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Ah, I see! Sorry. That's even more different than my Strand -> ranta example!

Sent from my iPhone

> On 18 May 2014, at 18:13, Jeffrey Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> /kalaka/ is the Hawaiianization of /trʌk/.  /t/ -> /k/  -  /r/ -> /l/  -
> /ʌ/ -> /a/  - No consonant clusters so /a/ is added between /k/ and /l/.
> No consonantal codas so /a/ is added after final /k/.
> It is the same loan word from English. One pronunciation has been
> integrated into the (extremely limited) phonology; the other is unmodified
> from English.
> 
> 
> 
> On Sun, May 18, 2014 at 9:44 AM, Jeff Daniel Rollin-Jones <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> I'd say that was less an example of different pronunciations, more an
>> example of different /words/; a better example might be a word like
>> "restaurant", which was probably pronounced by English speaks as /restorõ/
>> to begin with, but now almost everyone says /rest@ront/ or even
>> /restront/.
>> 
>> Other examples might be Latin plurals, where it was formerly common to use
>> the Latin plural of words like "appendix" (appendices in Latin, but,
>> especially in America, increasingly "appendixes"); sometimes these plurals
>> even get reanalysed as singular, as well someone says "criteria" when they
>> mean "criterion". I have not yet heard anyone use "criterions" or
>> "criteria".
>> 
>> Jeff
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On 18 May 2014, at 17:14, Jeffrey Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Coincidentally, I have been thinking about this (unintegrated loan words
>> in
>>> conlangs) for the last couple of weeks.
>>> There is a definite trend for conlangers to "smash" loan words into their
>>> phonology. And this is more true for auxlangs than artlangs. In the
>>> natworld (aka IRL), it happens all the time, because people are in
>> contact
>>> with other linguistic communities. The main issue for a conlanger is,
>> IMO,
>>> that to do this is a lot of work. If you are an artlanger with a
>> conworld,
>>> you need to have at least a sketch of the neighboring languages from
>> which
>>> to draw loan words (unless, I suppose, your conlang exists in this world,
>>> and the "foreign" language is Welsh or Chinese or whatever). And for an
>>> auxlanger, to do this seems to break the "purity" of the auxlang. But
>> IHRL
>>> (hypothetical real life), if people actually started using the auxlang,
>>> there would be loan words from their native languages, so the auxlanger
>>> should consider how to handle that.
>>> One thing that happens in natlangs is that the loan word exists in more
>>> than one pronunciation at the same time. For example, in Hawaiian, the
>> word
>>> "truck" is pronounced /kalaka/ per the dictionary - but Hawaiian speakers
>>> often say /trʌk/.
>>> Jeffrey
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> On Sun, May 18, 2014 at 7:03 AM, Mechthild Czapp <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Ltikva has many syllabic consonants, Rejistanian doesn't in native
>> words.
>>>> Certain loans however, like ntena and ltimka are loaned from the ltikva
>>>> language. Also, Majuvedian distinguishes between /z/ and /s/,
>> Rejistanian
>>>> generally uses these as homophones. Still the [sh] in shensa is
>> generally
>>>> /s/ (though /z:h/ or even a gemminated /z/ are also valid
>> pronunciations in
>>>> other dialects).
>>>> 
>>>>> On 2014-maj-18, at 09:42, Thomas Ruhm wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> I am wondering if many constructed languages have those. It would be
>>>> natural to have them, but they are much work to make and it is hard to
>>>> decide from which domains they have to come. Is it more common to head
>> for
>>>> a homogeneous sound system or rather one with some deviant loans?
>>