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That's a very interesting theory.

I've just been reading a paper on Suffixaufnahme, or case stacking. Whilst virtually unknown in Europe apart from Old Georgian and some other, dead, languages, it's quite common in Australia apparently.

In such languages, a noun phrase in a dependent relationship to another (not necessarily a genitive relationship) will take the case endings of its "governing noun phrase". Let us imagine a variant of English which is (a) agglutinative; (b) ergative, using the suffix -g; (c) uses Suffixaufnahme; (d) uses the suffix "-in" for the innessive case:

The man-g the field-in-g works hard

So here, the word "field" takes a suffix -g to agree with "man". The argument of the paper appears to be that in the normal case, where there is no case stacking, the grammar simply deletes all but the innermost case (the one most pertinent to the noun phrase, all the rest being agreement, applied in reverse order), but that when Suffixaufnahme happens, simply no deletion of cases occurs. Similarly, then, in the Finnish example, since there is no Suffixaufnahme the inessive case overrides the partitive case required by the noun. Admittedly, using the same analysis for both arguably requires that the number be in a slot "outside" that which provides innessive case, but note that Finnish also places possessive suffixes (actually clitics) after case and number suffixes, so the argument is not, perhaps, invalid.

Jeff

Sent from my iPhone

> On 18 May 2014, at 08:00, Siva Kalyan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> This may seem less mysterious if we understand the “partitive” in these languages as actually being a “partitive accusative” (or “partitive core”?), and there being no partitive for any of the other cases.  
> 
> Siva
> 
> 
> Sent with Mail Pilot  
> 
> 
> 
> On 18 May 2014 3:27:22 pm, Njenfalgar <[log in to unmask]> wrote:  
> 2014-05-18 11:40 GMT+07:00 David Peterson
> 
> 
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>:
> 
>> I just found a really neat set of data that I wanted to share. I'm sure
>> there's a ton of neat case stuff happening in Finnish, but I've never seen
>> this one before.
>> 
>> Finnish is a nominative/accusative language, but it also has a partitive
>> case that gets used in certain circumstances. One of them is when you
>> modify a noun with a number. Thus, you have examples like this:
>> 
>> Ostin ne kolme punaista sukkaa.
>> /bought-1SG those-ACC three red-PAR sock-PAR/
>> "I bought those three red socks."
>> 
>> Notice that the determiner has the accusative case, but the socks, the
>> actual objects, have the partitive, because they're modified by "three".
>> You'd imagine that this is just a rule you'd learn and remember whenever
>> using numbers, but it doesn't always apply, as shown below:
>> 
>> Havaitsin reiän niissä kolmessa punaisessa sukassa, jotka ostin.
>> /noticed-1SG hole-ACC those-INE three-INE red-INE sock-INE which-ACC
>> bought-1SG/
>> "I noticed a hole in those three red socks I bought."
>> 
>> Notice here the cases all match (and apparently the number has a case, too,
>> now). Replacing the inessives with partitives makes the sentence
>> ungrammatical:
>> 
>> *Havaitsin reiän niissä kolmessa punaista sukkaa, jotka ostin.
>> /noticed-1SG hole-ACC those-INE three-INE red-PAR sock-PAR which-ACC
>> bought-1SG/
>> "I noticed a hole in those three red socks I bought."
>> 
>> That was it; just thought it was neat. This came from a paper examining
>> Finnish relative clauses I found online. You can read the whole paper here:
>> 
>> http://full.btk.ppke.hu/index.php/FULL/article/view/8
>> 
>> -David
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> This reminds of Russian. If I remember correctly, Russian uses some
> genitives after numbers (genitive singular after 2, 3, and 4, genitive
> plural after higher numbers), but if some special case is needed (like
> instrumental or dative, not nominative, don't remember which way the
> accusative went), both the number and the word after default to the case
> called for. I don't know if this is exactly the same as in Finnish though
> (I don't know Finnish yet :-) ), but it looks like it.
> 
> Greets,
> David
> 
> --
> Yésináne gika asahukúka ha'u Kusikéla-Kísu yesahuwese witi nale lálu wíke
> uhu tu tinitíhi lise tesahuwese. Lise yésináne, lina, ikéwiyéwa etinizáwa
> búwubúwu niyi tutelíhi uhu yegeka.
> 
> http://njenfalgar.conlang.org/