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I often use this way of "not quite salutating" in deliberately informal
correspondence. For instance, I might write an email like "Thank you, Lou,
for this excellent suggestion." Whenever I do this, I'm very aware of the
fact that I'm not "salutating"  but am actively avoiding it. A very
different case from the very formal royal opener Paul Schaffner mentions
in another email. So I agree with Lou if I understand him correctly as
saying that whatever this kind of thing is it isn't a case of <salute>. It
belongs somewhere in a 'narratological typology' of names that begins with
'MHNIN AEIDE QEA' and 'ANDRA MOI ENNEPE MOUSA', apostrophic uses of names,
if you will. There will be many shades of gray and  other colours, and I
wonder whether any attempt to manage it with elements or attributes will
sooner rather than later remind us (or at least me) of Wallace Stevens'
line "The squirming facts exceed the squamous mind."


Martin Mueller
Professor emeritus of English and Classics
Northwestern University




On 6/26/14, 6:02, "Lou Burnard" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

><opener>, <salute> and other divLiminal elements were originally thought
>of in the context of print or manuscript traditions which set off such
>things visually from the other "plain" paragraphs of a document.
>However, some of them (notably <salute>) also have a semantic aspect
>which can apply to any string of text, within or outside of a <p>.
>
>In the case where a printed version of the text would plausibly offset
>the salutation from the rest, I think I would prefer something like
><salute rend="inline">Dear Freddy</salute><p>How are you?</p>
>
>If you want an inline-salutation element, I think it has to be a
>different one. And you also have to decide whether you will treat things
>like
>
><p>How, my dear Freddy, are you?</p>
>
>in the same way.
>
>
>
>   On 26/06/14 10:05, Peter Stadler wrote:
>> Dear Peter,
>>
>> I got no solution but all I can tell is: you¹re not alone ;-)
>> There are several correspondence related elements (opener, closer,
>>postscript, salute, signed) which impose a (prototypic) structure that
>>not necessarily matches with "real³ correspondence texts. The issue is
>>on the Correspondence SIG¹s agenda [1] but has been deferred because we
>>started with the "easy" header additions [2].
>>
>> Best
>> Peter
>>
>> [1] 
>>http://wiki.tei-c.org/index.php/SIG:Correspondence#Topics_currently_under
>>_discussion
>> [2] https://sourceforge.net/p/tei/feature-requests/510/
>>
>> Am 26.06.2014 um 10:24 schrieb Peter Boot <[log in to unmask]>:
>>
>>> This seems like a rather basic question, but how do you all deal with
>>>salutations that are embedded within the first paragraph of a letter or
>>>postcard?
>>>
>>> When the salutation is placed above the text, we use:
>>>
>>>         <opener>
>>>            <salute>Dear Freddy</salute>
>>>         </opener>
>>>         <p>How are you?</p>
>>>
>>> But we have a postcard that starts like this:
>>>
>>> Dear Freddy, how are you
>>>
>>> Since salute is not allowed immediately in a paragraph, we could
>>>introduce a new element ('opener-inline')  to deal with this:
>>>
>>>         <p><opener-inline><salute>Dear
>>>Freddy</salute></opener-inline>, how are you?</p>
>>>
>>> Or just allow salute within p, which seems the preferable solution to
>>>me.
>>>
>>> Similar issues arise in closing salutations, that can also be embedded
>>>within regular paragraphs. We have a postscript like this:
>>>
>>>             <postscript><p>Mr. Foster came to see me, I am going to
>>>                   him tomorrow. <salute>Good bye. Au
>>>revoir!</salute></p></postscript>
>>>
>>> where you wouldn't want to move the salute to a fictitious closer.
>>>
>>> Peter