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I probably would not tag many such marginally salutatary embedded
phrases either, and I'd concede that salutation is a broad semantic
category that leaves a lot of room for local practice in deciding which
members of that category deserve the notoriously <salute> label.

On the other hand, I would be leery of embracing as a principle the
notion that div-top and div-bottom material, in order to be tagged,
must be 'block' level in format, or otherwise visually distinct from
the paragraphs that form the body of the div. Visual distinctiveness
is a valuable servant to the tagger, but a poor master; and by and
large, when applying such basic structural tags I would hope that
two books that are textually identical, albeit formatted differently,
should receive the same markup. The same considerations apply, 
mutatis mutandis, to <head>  <trailer> <signed> <dateline> and
so forth. Perhaps I am influenced by the extreme formal variety
of our material: in some of our earliest books, for example, there
are no block level elements at all: paragraphs, heads, trailers, 
are all run together as continuous text. But that does not mean
that the constituent elements are not there (though the <p>s are 
of course debatable and should perhaps yield to <ab>.), just that
they are harder to see. Submitted this .26. day of June
2014 novo stylo. Your servant, pfs. A. M. G. D.

On Fri, Jun 27, 2014, at 12:57, Peter Boot wrote:
> Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions and ideas. I'm not sure I agree
> with Martin that there is no salute in that sentence. It's true, however,
> that there are probably many cases of doubt. Presently I feel the best
> solution might be not to encode at all the inline saluting phrases.
> 
> Peter
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion list [mailto:TEI-
> > [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Martin Mueller
> > Sent: Friday, June 27, 2014 5:25 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: [TEI-L] Salute within paragraph
> > 
> > I often use this way of "not quite salutating" in deliberately informal
> > correspondence. For instance, I might write an email like "Thank you, Lou, for
> > this excellent suggestion." Whenever I do this, I'm very aware of the fact that
> > I'm not "salutating"  but am actively avoiding it. A very different case from
> > the very formal royal opener Paul Schaffner mentions in another email. So I
> > agree with Lou if I understand him correctly as saying that whatever this kind
> > of thing is it isn't a case of <salute>. It belongs somewhere in a 'narratological
> > typology' of names that begins with 'MHNIN AEIDE QEA' and 'ANDRA MOI
> > ENNEPE MOUSA', apostrophic uses of names, if you will. There will be many
> > shades of gray and  other colours, and I wonder whether any attempt to
> > manage it with elements or attributes will sooner rather than later remind us
> > (or at least me) of Wallace Stevens'
> > line "The squirming facts exceed the squamous mind."
> > 
> > 
> > Martin Mueller
> > Professor emeritus of English and Classics Northwestern University
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > On 6/26/14, 6:02, "Lou Burnard" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > 
> > ><opener>, <salute> and other divLiminal elements were originally
> > >thought of in the context of print or manuscript traditions which set
> > >off such things visually from the other "plain" paragraphs of a document.
> > >However, some of them (notably <salute>) also have a semantic aspect
> > >which can apply to any string of text, within or outside of a <p>.
> > >
> > >In the case where a printed version of the text would plausibly offset
> > >the salutation from the rest, I think I would prefer something like
> > ><salute rend="inline">Dear Freddy</salute><p>How are you?</p>
> > >
> > >If you want an inline-salutation element, I think it has to be a
> > >different one. And you also have to decide whether you will treat
> > >things like
> > >
> > ><p>How, my dear Freddy, are you?</p>
> > >
> > >in the same way.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >   On 26/06/14 10:05, Peter Stadler wrote:
> > >> Dear Peter,
> > >>
> > >> I got no solution but all I can tell is: you¹re not alone ;-)  There
> > >>are several correspondence related elements (opener, closer,
> > >>postscript, salute, signed) which impose a (prototypic) structure that
> > >>not necessarily matches with "real³ correspondence texts. The issue is
> > >>on the Correspondence SIG¹s agenda [1] but has been deferred because
> > >>we started with the "easy" header additions [2].
> > >>
> > >> Best
> > >> Peter
> > >>
> > >> [1]
> > >>http://wiki.tei-
> > c.org/index.php/SIG:Correspondence#Topics_currently_un
> > >>der
> > >>_discussion
> > >> [2] https://sourceforge.net/p/tei/feature-requests/510/
> > >>
> > >> Am 26.06.2014 um 10:24 schrieb Peter Boot
> > <[log in to unmask]>:
> > >>
> > >>> This seems like a rather basic question, but how do you all deal
> > >>>with salutations that are embedded within the first paragraph of a
> > >>>letter or postcard?
> > >>>
> > >>> When the salutation is placed above the text, we use:
> > >>>
> > >>>         <opener>
> > >>>            <salute>Dear Freddy</salute>
> > >>>         </opener>
> > >>>         <p>How are you?</p>
> > >>>
> > >>> But we have a postcard that starts like this:
> > >>>
> > >>> Dear Freddy, how are you
> > >>>
> > >>> Since salute is not allowed immediately in a paragraph, we could
> > >>>introduce a new element ('opener-inline')  to deal with this:
> > >>>
> > >>>         <p><opener-inline><salute>Dear
> > >>>Freddy</salute></opener-inline>, how are you?</p>
> > >>>
> > >>> Or just allow salute within p, which seems the preferable solution
> > >>>to me.
> > >>>
> > >>> Similar issues arise in closing salutations, that can also be
> > >>>embedded within regular paragraphs. We have a postscript like this:
> > >>>
> > >>>             <postscript><p>Mr. Foster came to see me, I am going to
> > >>>                   him tomorrow. <salute>Good bye. Au
> > >>>revoir!</salute></p></postscript>
> > >>>
> > >>> where you wouldn't want to move the salute to a fictitious closer.
> > >>>
> > >>> Peter
-- 
Paul Schaffner  Digital Library Production Service
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