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I agree with both you and Professor Thomason, but fear that Peter is correct in his assumption it would disappear. Of course, it could be that although it's an unstable phoneme, it happens to exist synchronically, for at least some speakers, in the dialect I'm describing, at the time I'm describing it.

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> On 3 Jun 2014, at 17:40, David McCann <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> On Tue, 3 Jun 2014 17:27:30 +0100
> Jeff Daniel Rollin-Jones <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> I've been working on extending/modifying the phonology of Meino (now
>> newly renamed Muuna) to make it a little less slavishly Finnic, and
>> while browsing the Wikipedia article on the IPA, noticed that there
>> are no coarticulated ejectives listed. Given normal human physiology,
>> is there any reason why such phonemes would not exist?
> 
> The IPA was created in the 19th century by British and French scholars,
> initially to aid the teaching of languages — i.e. European ones — in
> schools. When they expanded it to cover other languages, the ones used
> in the colonies got priority, so the implosives (Africa) got their own
> symbols and the ejectives (Americas, Caucasus) had to make do with a
> diacritic.
> 
> Personally, when it comes to the IPA, I agree with Prof. Sally Thomason:
> http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/005287.html