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2014-06-15 21:56, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews skrev:
> What does the map look like?

Just a couple of maps with the name of a language on each state,
broken up along parameters like
"Most spoken language other than English" (Spanish nearly everywhere)
"Most spoken language other than English and Spanish"
"Most spoken Native American language"
"Most spoken Scandinavian/Indo-Aryan/African language"

It mostly confirms that migrants, both inside a country and from 
outside tend to settle where there already are people from where 
the come from.  Hardly surprising!

>
> Pen Name
> Mellissa Green
> twitter @abluegreenunivs
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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John Q
> Sent: Sunday, June 15, 2014 3:27 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Maps of non-English languages in the U.S.
>
> I came across these (rather simplistic) maps showing the relative popularity of non-English languages in the U.S. on a state-by-state level.  No comparative numbers or percentages or specific geographic breakdowns beyond the state level, but they're interesting nonetheless.  I learned a few things about U.S. language distribution I didn't know.
>
> http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2014/05/language_map_what_s_the_most_popular_language_in_your_state.html
>
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