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Since I suck at inventing vocabulary I decided that my conlang Éuía Twás
[ˈeɥiɐ̯ twˈas] at some period borrowed extensively from Middle IndoAryan
languages. Originally I intended that there was one early layer from a
Central variety and a later layer from a more advanced Eastern variety, but
I discovered that the "more advanced" layer was actually the earlier which
had taken part in Euia Twas sound changes, while the "less advanced" was a
later more "literary" layer of loans. An example of the "advanced" layer is
_khorýy_ [ˈkʰoɾəɰ] which comes from _ghoṭaka_ but designates a fable
animal in Euia Twas, which is spoken on three islands in the Indian Ocean
which from north to south are called Ántáa Máthíi and Ẃtáa. No prize for
figuring out the etymology of those names! The Latin orthography is evil by
design. The letters _a i u w y_ can designate both vowels [a ɪ ʏ ʊ ᵻ/ə],
which get an acute in careful writing, and approximants [ɐ̯ j ɥ w ɰ] (_a_
becoming _r_ between vowels so that the peculiar dialect of Antaa is _euir
Antaa) and there are also the tense vowels _áa íi úu ẃw ýy_ [ɐ i y u ɨ] and
_z_ which is a dental approximant. Coda _ay ey_ are [ɑː] and [ɜː]. The
consonants _i u w_ can occur non-postvocalically but there are also _ny ly_
for velar nasal and lateral respectively; _ni li_ being alveopalatals along
with _c j x_. BTW all Indic sibilants become _x_ so that _sarvajñā_ becomes
_xárẃwniá_ for example. Indic voiced aspirates become ET voiceless
aspirates _kh ch th/rh th ph_ while voiceless aspirates become fricatives
_h x hr th/z q_ where _q_ is /xʷ/ which got its own letter because it could
and because it occurs word-finally where /kʷ/ merges with it. (_F_ exists
at least theoretically in recent Arabic and European loan words.) This is
not as strange as it may seem as both voiced and voiceless single
intervocalic stops become _y i r z w_. Indic _h_ becomes _y_ as well, and
is then lost initially and lost or metathesed after voiced stops, and then
subject to assimilation with palatal and/or rounded vowels. This happens to
_i w_ also which become _u_ in appropriate contexts. Thus _éuía_ is _éw_
'mouth' with the "relative particle" //ir//. I haven't yet decided whether
ET is truly head-marking or if this morpheme just happens to cliticize to
the preceding word though!

/bpj

torsdag 19 juni 2014 skrev Siva Kalyan <[log in to unmask]>:

> It struck me today that there are many languages in the world which are
> hardly ever spoken without codeswitching into (or freely borrowing from)
> another language—I’m thinking of Indian languages, mainly, but also
> Japanese.
>
> Has anyone designed a conlang with this sort of usage in mind? On the one
> hand, vocabulary design would become much easier (you wouldn’t need to
> bother with most technical or business terminology), but on the other hand,
> you’d need to design “carrier” constructions for incorporating foreign
> words into native syntactic structures. (E.g. Japanese “X + suru”:
> “toreeningu suru”, etc.)
>
> Actually, the vocabulary wouldn’t necessarily be all that easy: you’d need
> to include some semantic shifts in borrowed vocabulary; and also some “fake
> English (or whatever)” (along the lines of wasei eigo, or German “Handy”);
> and also idioms incorporating borrowed vocabulary.
>
> A language having such a “symbiotic relationship” with English (or another
> major language) would be quite realistic, in a way that I suspect many
> conlangs aren’t (or aren’t intended to be).
>
> Siva
>
>
> Sent with Mail Pilot
>